19156b0446f42d46ad003007d786076e59e17dc1
[jalview-manual.git] / TheJalviewTutorial.tex
1 %\documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{report}
2 \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{book}
3 \usepackage[format=hang,margin=10pt]{caption}
4 \usepackage{footnote}
5 \usepackage{graphicx}
6 \usepackage{fouriernc}
7 %\usepackage{amssymb}
8 \usepackage{epstopdf}
9 \usepackage{hyperref}
10 \usepackage{subfigure}
11 \DeclareGraphicsRule{.tif}{png}{.png}{`convert #1 `dirname #1`/`basename #1 .tif`.png}
12 \voffset = -0.5 in
13 \hoffset = -0.85 in
14 \textwidth = 6.5 in 
15 \textheight = 9.5 in 
16 \oddsidemargin = 1.20 in
17 \evensidemargin = 0.2 in
18 \topmargin = 0.0 in 
19 \headheight = 0.35 in
20 \headsep = 0.4 in
21 %\headheight = 0.0 in \headsep = 0.0 in
22 \parskip = 0.2in \parindent = 0.0in
23
24
25 \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
26 \newtheorem{corollary}[theorem]{Corollary}
27 \newtheorem{definition}{Definition}
28
29
30 \title{Jalview 2.10.3: A manual and introductory tutorial }
31 \author{David Martin, James Procter, Andrew Waterhouse, Saif Shehata, Nancy Giang,Suzanne Duce and Geoff Barton}
32 \date{Manual version 1.2.3 6th May 2011}
33
34 \newcommand{\clearemptydoublepage}{\newpage{\pagestyle{empty}}\cleardoublepage}
35
36 % how the hell do we add another panel with text like : This tutorial introduces
37 % the user to the features of Jalview, a multiple sequence alignment editor and
38 % viewer available from http://www.jalview.org to the title page.
39
40 % \renewcommand{menustyle}{\tt} %do something more advanced here.
41
42 \newcounter{ecount} 
43 \newcounter{exstep}[ecount]
44 \renewcommand{\theecount} {\arabic{ecount}}
45 \renewcommand{\theexstep} {\arabic{ecount}.\alph{exstep}}
46
47 \newcommand{\exercise}[2] { 
48 \refstepcounter{ecount}
49 \begin{center} \fbox{\parbox[b][\height]{6in}{ 
50 {\bf
51 % this doesn't work - page refs are off 
52 %  \mbox{\addcontentsline{toc}{subsection}{ Exercise \theecount : #1 } }
53 Exercise \theecount  :  #1  } 
54 \par #2 }} \end{center}
55 \pagebreak[0]
56 }
57 \newcommand{\exstep}[1]{ \stepcounter{exstep} {\sl \theexstep.}  \begin{minipage}[t]{5.5in} #1 \end{minipage} \par \vspace *{1mm} }
58 %%% Remove the % on the next 2 lines to hide tutorials.
59 %\renewcommand{\exercise}[2]{} 
60 %\renewcommand{\exstep}[1]{} 
61
62 \begin{document}
63
64
65 \pagenumbering{}
66
67 %\maketitle
68 % we make our own title because JBP is not clever enough to work out how
69 % to
70 % do
71 % this automatically
72
73 \begin{center}
74
75 {\Huge
76  
77 Jalview 2.11}
78 \vspace{0.5in}
79 {\huge 
80
81 Manual and  Introductory Tutorial }
82
83 \vspace{2.2in}
84
85 {\large
86
87 David Martin, James Procter, Ben Soares 
88
89 Andrew Waterhouse, Saif Shehata, Nancy Giang 
90
91 Mungo Carstairs, Charles Ofoegbu, Kira Mour\~{a}o
92
93 Suzanne Duce and Geoff Barton 
94
95 }
96
97 \vspace{0.9in}
98
99 School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee
100
101 Dundee, Scotland DD1 5EH, UK
102 \vspace{2in}
103
104 Manual Version 1.9.3
105 % post CLS lifesci course on 15th January
106 % draft. Remaining items are AACon, RNA visualization/editing and Protein disorder analysis exercises.
107
108
109 10th May 2019
110
111
112 \end{center}
113
114 %\newpage
115
116 \clearemptydoublepage
117
118 % ($Revision: 1.55 $) 11th October 2010.}
119 % TODO revise for 2.6
120
121 \pagenumbering{roman}
122 \setcounter{page}{1}
123 \tableofcontents 
124 %\clearemptydoublepage
125 % \listoffigures 
126 % \newpage
127 % \listoftables 
128 \newpage
129 \pagenumbering{arabic}
130 \setcounter{page}{1}
131 \chapter{Basics}
132 \label{jalviewbasics}
133 \section{Introduction}
134 \subsection{Jalview}
135 Jalview is a multiple sequence alignment viewer, editor and analysis tool.
136 It is designed to be platform independent (running on Mac, MS Windows, Linux
137 and any other platforms that support Java). Jalview is capable of editing and
138 analysing large alignments (thousands of sequences) with minimal degradation in
139 performance. It is able to show multiple integrated views of the alignment
140 and other data. Jalview can read and write many common sequence formats including
141 FASTA, Clustal, MSF(GCG) and PIR.
142
143
144 There are two types of Jalview program. The {\bf Jalview Desktop} is a standalone 
145 application that provides powerful editing, visualization, annotation and
146 analysis capabilities. The {\bf JalviewJS} that has the same core
147 visualization, editing and analysis capabilities as the desktop, without the
148 desktop's webservice. It is designed to be
149 opened in a web browser,\footnote{A demonstration version of Jalview (Jalview Micro
150 Edition) also runs on a mobile phone but the functionality is limited.} and includes a javascript API.
151
152
153 The Jalview Desktop provides access to protein and nucleic acid sequence, alignment and structure
154 databases, and includes the Jmol\footnote{ Provided under the LGPL licence at
155 \url{http://www.jmol.org}} and Chimera viewer for molecular structures, and the
156 VARNA\footnote{Provided under GPL licence at \url{http://varna.lri.fr}} program for the visualization of RNA secondary structure. It also
157 provides a graphical user interface for the multiple sequence alignment, conservation analysis 
158 and protein disorder prediction methods provided as {\bf Ja}va {\bf B}ioinformatics
159 {\bf A}nalysis {\bf W}eb {\bf S}ervices (JABAWS). JABAWS\footnote{released under GPL at \url{http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jabaws}} is a system for 
160 running bioinformatics programs that you can download and run on your own machine or cluster, or install on compute clouds.
161
162 \subsection{Jalview's Capabilities}
163 % TODO add references to appropriate sections for each capability described here.
164 Figure \ref{jvcapabilities} gives an overview of the main features of the
165 Jalview desktop application. Its primary function is the editing and
166 visualization of sequence alignments, and their interactive analysis. Tree
167 building, principal components analysis, physico-chemical property conservation
168 and sequence consensus analyses are built into the program. Web services enable
169 Jalview to access online alignment and secondary structure prediction programs,
170 as well as to retrieve protein and nucleic acid sequences, alignments, protein structures and sequence annotation. 
171 Sequences, alignments, trees, structures, features and alignment annotation may also be exchanged with the local filesystem. 
172 Multiple visualizations of an alignment may be worked on simultaneously, and the user interface provides a comprehensive set of controls for colouring and layout. 
173 Alignment views are dynamically linked with Jmol and UCSF Chimera\footnote{UCSF Chimera needs to be installed separately. It is available free for academic use from \url{https://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/download.html}.} structure displays,
174 a tree viewer and spatial cluster display, facilitating interactive exploration of the alignment's structure. The application provides its own Jalview project file format in order 
175 to store the current state of an alignment and analysis windows. Jalview also provides WYSIWIG\footnote{WYSIWIG: What You See Is What You Get.} style
176  figure generation capabilities for the preparation of alignments for publication.
177 \begin{figure}[htbp]
178 \begin{center}
179 \includegraphics[width=5.8in]{images/jvcapabilities.pdf}
180 \caption{{\bf Capabilities of the Jalview Desktop.} The Jalview Desktop Application provides a stable environment for the creation, editing and analysis of alignments and the generation of figures.}
181 \label{jvcapabilities}
182 \end{center}
183 \end{figure}
184
185 \subsubsection{Jalview History}
186 Jalview was initially developed in 1996 by Michele Clamp, James Cuff, Steve
187 Searle and Geoff Barton at the University of Oxford and then the European
188 Bioinformatics Institute. Development of Jalview 2 was made possible with
189 eScience funding from the BBSRC\footnote{Biotechnology and Biological Sciences
190 Research Council grant  {\sl ``VAMSAS: Visualization and Analysis of Molecules,
191 Sequence Alignments and Structures"}, a joint project to enable interoperability
192 between Jalview, TOPALi and AstexViewer.} in 2004, enabling Andrew Waterhouse and
193 Jim Procter to re-engineer the original program to introduce contemporary developments
194 in bioinformatics and take advantage of the latest web and Java technology.
195 Jalview's development has been supported from 2009
196 onwards by BBSRC funding, and since 2014 by a
197 Wellcome Trust Biomedical Resource grant\footnote{Wellcome grant number 101651/Z/13/Z}. In 2010, 2011, and 2012, Jalview benefitted from the
198 \href{http://code.google.com/soc/}{Google Summer of Code}, when Lauren Lui and Jan Engelhardt introduced new features for handling RNA alignments and secondary structure annotation, in collaboration with Yann Ponty.\footnote{\url{http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/~ponty/}}
199
200  
201 %TODO describe future plans in history ? not a good idea.
202 % Jalview continues to be one of the worlds most popular\footnote{and in the authors opinion, the best.} sequence alignment and analysis tools.
203
204 \subsubsection{Citing Jalview}
205 If you use Jalview in your work you should cite:\newline
206 {\sl "Jalview Version 2 - a multiple sequence alignment editor and analysis
207 workbench"}\newline Waterhouse, A.M., Procter, J.B., Martin, D.M.A, Clamp, M. and Barton, G. J. (2009) \newline {\sl Bioinformatics}  doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btp033
208
209 This paper supersedes the original Jalview publication:\newline {\sl "The
210 Jalview Java alignment editor"} \newline Michele Clamp, James Cuff, Stephen M. Searle and Geoffrey J. Barton (2004) \newline {\sl Bioinformatics} {\bf 20} 426-427. 
211
212   
213 \subsection{About this Tutorial }
214
215 This tutorial is written in a manual format with short exercises where
216 appropriate. The first few sections concerns the
217 basic operation of Jalview and should be sufficient for those who want to
218 launch Jalview (Section \ref{startingjv}), open an alignment (Section
219 \ref{loadingseqs}), perform basic editing (Section
220 \ref{selectingandediting}), colouring (Section \ref{colours}), and produce
221 publication and presentation quality graphical output (Section \ref{layoutandoutput}).
222
223 The remaining sections of the manual cover the visualization and
224 analysis techniques available in Jalview. These include working
225 with the embedded Jmol molecular structure viewer (or UCSF Chimera), building
226 and viewing trees and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) plots, and using
227 trees for sequence conservation analysis. Section \ref{featannot} details the creation and visualization of sequence,
228 features and alignment annotation. The alignment and secondary structure prediction services are described
229 in detail in Sections \ref{msaservices} and \ref{protsspredservices}
230 respectively. Section \ref{workingwithnuc} discusses
231 specific features of use when working with nucleic acid sequences, such as translation and linking to protein coding regions, and 
232 the display and analysis of RNA secondary structure.  An overview of
233 the Jalview Desktop's webservices is given in Section \ref{jvwebservices}.
234
235 %^Chapter \ref{jalviewadvanced} The third chapter covers the detail^ of Jalview and is aimed at the user who is
236 %already familiar with Jalview operation but wants to get more out of their
237 %Jalview experience.
238
239 \subsubsection{Typographic Conventions}
240
241 Keystrokes using the special non-symbol keys are represented in the tutorial by
242 enclosing the pressed keys with square brackets ({\em e.g.} [RETURN] or [CTRL]).
243
244 Keystroke combinations are denoted with a `-' symbol ({\em
245 e.g.} [CTRL]-C means press [CTRL] and the `C' key simultaneously).
246
247 Menu options are given as a path from the menu
248 that contains them. For example {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment
249 $\Rightarrow$ From URL} means to select the `From URL' option from the `Input
250 Alignment' submenu of a window's `File' dropdown menu.
251
252 \section{Launching the Jalview Desktop Application}
253 \label{startingjv}
254 \begin{figure}[htbp]
255 \begin{center}
256 \includegraphics[width=4.5in]{images/download.pdf}
257 \caption{\bf Download page on the Jalview web site at www.jalview.org.}
258 \label{download}
259 \end{center}
260 \end{figure}
261
262 This tutorial is based on the Jalview
263 Desktop application. Much of the information will also be useful for users of
264 the JalviewJS, which has the same core editing, analysis and visualization capabilities. The Jalview Desktop, however, is much more powerful, and
265 includes additional support for interaction with external web services, and
266 production of publication quality graphics.
267
268 The Jalview Desktop can be run in two ways; as an application launched from the
269 web {\sl via} Java webstart, or as an application loaded onto your hard drive. 
270 The webstart version is launched from the `Launch Jalview Desktop
271 button' at the top right hand side of pages of the website 
272 \href{http://www.jalview.org}{(www.jalview.org)}.
273 To download the locally installable version, follow the links on the download
274 page
275 \href{http://www.jalview.org/download}{(www.jalview.org/download) }
276  (Figure \ref{download}).
277 These links will launch the latest stable release of Jalview.\par
278
279 %% this paragraph needs to be rewritten for the new signed certificate from Certum.
280
281 When the application is launched with webstart, dialogs may appear before
282 the application starts. If your browser is not set up to handle webstart, then
283 clicking the launch link may download a file that needs to be opened
284 manually, or prompt you to select the program to handle the webstart
285 file. If that is the case, you will need to locate the {\bf javaws} program
286 on your system\footnote{The file that is downloaded will have a type of {\bf
287 application/x-java-jnlp-file} or {\bf .jnlp}. The {\bf javaws} program that can run
288 this file is usually found in the {\bf bin} directory of your Java
289 installation}. Once java webstart has been launched, you may also be prompted to
290 accept a security certificate signed by the Barton Group.\footnote{On some
291 systems, the certificate may be signed by 'UNKNOWN'. In this case, clicking
292 through the dialogs to look at the detailed information about the certificate
293 should reveal it to be a Barton group certificate.} You can always trust us, so
294 click trust or accept as appropriate. The splash screen (Figure \ref{splash})
295 gives information about the version and build date that you are running,
296 information about later versions (if available), and the paper to cite in your
297 publications. This information is also available on the Jalview web site at 
298 \url{http://www.jalview.org}.
299
300 %[fig 2] 
301 \begin{figure}[htbp]
302
303 \begin{center}
304 \includegraphics[width=4.5in]{images/splash.pdf}
305 \caption{{\bf Jalview splash screen.}}
306 \label{splash}
307 \end{center}
308 \end{figure}
309
310 When Jalview starts it will automatically load an example alignment from the
311 Jalview site. This behaviour can be switched off in the Jalview Desktop
312 preferences dialog  by unchecking the open file option.
313 This alignment will look like the one in Figure \ref{startpage} (taken
314 from Jalview version 2.10.1).
315
316 %[figure 3 ]
317 \begin{figure}[htbp]
318 \begin{center}
319 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/start.pdf}
320 \caption{{\bf Default startup for Jalview.}}
321 \label{startpage}
322 \end{center}
323 \end{figure}
324
325
326 \subsubsection{Jalview News RSS Feed}
327
328 Announcements are made available to users of the
329 Jalview Desktop {\sl via} the Jalview Newsreader. This window will open
330 automatically when new news is available, and can also be accessed {\sl via} the
331 Desktop's {\sl Tools $\Rightarrow$ Show Jalview News} menu entry. 
332
333 \begin{figure}[htbp]
334 \begin{center}
335 \includegraphics[height=3in]{images/jvrssnews.pdf}
336 \caption{{\bf The Jalview News Reader.} The newsreader opens automatically
337 when new articles are available from the Jalview Desktop's news channel.}
338 \label{jalviewrssnews}
339 \end{center}
340 \end{figure}
341
342
343 \exercise{Launching Jalview from the Jalview Website}{
344 \label{start}
345 \exstep{Open the Jalview web site
346 \href{http://www.jalview.org}{(www.jalview.org)}
347 in your web browser. Launch Jalview by clicking on the
348 pink `Launch Jalview' Desktop button in the top right hand corner. This
349 will download and open a jalview.jnlp webstart file.}
350 \exstep {Dialog boxes
351 will open and ask if you want to open the jalview.jnlp file as the file is an application downloaded from the
352 Internet, click {\sl Open}. (Note you may be asked to update Java, if you agree
353 then it will automatically update the Java software). As Jalview opens, four demo
354 Jalview windows automatically load.}
355 \exstep {If
356 you are having trouble, it may help changing the browser you are using, as the browsers and
357 its version may affect this process.}
358 \exstep{To disable opening of the demonstration project during the launch, go
359 to the {\sl Tools $\Rightarrow$
360 Preferences...} menu on the desktop. A `Preference'
361 dialog box opens, untick the box adjacent to the `Open file' entry in the
362 `Visual' preferences tab.
363 Click {\sl OK} to save the preferences.}
364 \exstep{Launch another Jalview workbench from the web site by clicking on the
365 pink Launch button.
366 The example alignment should not be loaded as Jalview starts up.}
367 \exstep{To reload the original demo file select the
368 {\em File$\Rightarrow$ From URL} entry in the Desktop menu. Click on
369 the URL history button (a downward arrow on the right hand side of the dialog
370 box) to view the files, select exampleFile\_2\_7.jar
371 (\url{http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile_2_7.jar}) 
372 then click {\sl OK}.}
373 \begin{list}{$\circ$}{\newline
374   \newline {\bf
375   Notes}}
376   
377 \item {To make Jalview display a different alignment when it is launched, then go
378 to the {\sl Tools $\Rightarrow$
379 Preferences...} menu on the desktop. Then tick the `Open file' entry of `Visual'
380 preferences tab, type in the URL of the sequence you want to load.}
381 \item {You may want to move the jalview.jnlp file from your {\bf downloads} to another folder.}
382 \item {Opening Jalview via the jnlp file will also allow Jalview to be launched offline.}
383 \end{list}
384
385 {\bf See the video at:
386 \url{http://www.jalview.org/Help/Getting-Started}.}
387  }
388
389 \subsection{Getting Help}
390 \label{gettinghelp}
391 \subsubsection{Built in Documentation}
392 Jalview has comprehensive on-line help documentation. Select  {\sl Help
393 $\Rightarrow$ Documentation} from the main desktop window menu and a new window
394 will open (Figure \ref{help}). The appropriate topic can then be selected from the
395 navigation panel on the left hand side. To search for a specific topic, click
396 the `search' tab and enter keywords in the box which appears.
397
398
399 \begin{figure}[htbp]
400 \begin{center}
401 \parbox[c]{2in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/help1.pdf}}}
402 \parbox[c]{4in}{\includegraphics[width=4in]{images/help2.pdf}}
403 \caption{{\bf Accessing the built in Jalview documentation.}}
404 \label{help}
405 \end{center}
406 \end{figure}
407
408 \subsubsection{Email Lists}
409
410 The Jalview Discussion list ({\tt jalview-discuss@jalview.org}) provides a forum
411 for Jalview users and developers to raise problems and exchange ideas - any
412 problems, bugs, and requests for help should be raised here. The {\tt
413 jalview-announce@jalview.org} list can also be subscribed to if you wish to be
414 kept informed of new releases and developments. 
415
416 Archives and mailing list
417 subscription details can be found in the Jalview web site's \href{http://www.jalview.org/community}{community section}.
418
419
420 \section{Navigation}
421 \label{jvnavigation}
422 The major features of the Jalview Desktop are illustrated in Figure \ref{anatomy}. The alignment window is the primary window for editing and visualization, and can contain several independent views of the alignment being worked with. The other windows (Trees, Structures, PCA plots, etc) are linked to a specific alignment view. Each area of the alignment window has a separate context menu accessed by clicking the right mouse button.  
423
424  Jalview has two navigation and editing modes: {\bf normal mode}, where
425  editing and navigation is performed using the mouse, and {\bf cursor mode}
426  where editing and navigation are performed using the keyboard. The {\bf F2}
427  key is used to switch between these two modes. 
428  
429  {\em Note:} On MacBooks and other laptops with compact keyboards, you may need
430  to press the function key {\bf [Fn]} when pressing any of the numbered function
431  keys. So to toggle between keyboard and normal mode, press {\bf [Fn]-[F2]}.
432  
433
434 \begin{figure}[htb]
435 \begin{center}
436 \includegraphics[width=6.5in]{images/jalview_anatomy.pdf}
437 \caption{{\bf The anatomy of Jalview.} The major features of the Jalview Desktop
438 Application are labeled.}
439 % TODO: modify text labels to be clearer - black on grey and black border for clarity
440 \label{anatomy}
441 \end{center}
442 \end{figure}
443
444 \subsection{Navigation in Normal Mode}
445
446 Jalview always starts up in Normal mode, where the mouse is used to interact
447 with the displayed alignment view. You can move about the alignment by clicking
448 and dragging the ruler scroll bar to move horizontally, or by clicking and
449 dragging the alignment scroll bar to the right of the alignment to move
450 vertically.  If all the rows or columns in the alignment are displayed, the
451 scroll bars will not be visible.
452
453  Each alignment view shown in the alignment window presents a window onto the
454  visible regions of the alignment. This means that with anything more than a few
455  residues or sequences, alignments can become difficult to visualize on the
456  screen because only a small area can be shown at a time. Here, it helps, to
457  have an overview of the whole alignment, especially when it is large.
458  Select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Overview Window} from the Alignment
459  window menu bar (Figure \ref{overview}).
460 % (Figure4)
461 \begin{figure}[htbp]
462 \begin{center}
463 \includegraphics[width=4.5in]{images/overview.pdf}
464 \caption{{\bf Alignment Overview Window.} The overview window for a view is
465 opened from the {\em View} menu.}
466 \label{overview}
467 \end{center}
468 \end{figure}
469
470 The red box in the overview window shows the current view in the alignment
471 window. A percent identity histogram is plotted below the alignment overview.
472 Shaded parts indicate rows and columns of the alignment that are hidden (for more information see Section
473 \ref{hidingregions}). You can navigate around the alignment by dragging the red
474 box. 
475
476 %Try this now and see how the view in the alignment window changes.
477
478 \parbox[c]{3in}{Alignment and analysis windows are closed by clicking on the
479 usual `close' icon (indicated by arrows on Mac OS X). If you want to close all
480 the alignments and analysis windows at once, then use the {\sl Window
481 $\Rightarrow$ Close All} option from the Jalview desktop.
482
483 {\bf \em{Warning: Make sure you have saved your work because this cannot be
484 undone!}} }
485 \parbox[c]{3in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/start_closeall.pdf}
486 }}
487
488 \subsection{Navigation in Cursor Mode}
489 \label{cursormode}
490 \parbox[c]{5in}{Cursor mode navigation enables the user to quickly
491 and precisely navigate, select and edit parts of an alignment. On pressing F2 to
492 enter cursor mode the position of the cursor is indicated by a black background
493 and white text. The cursor can be placed using the mouse or moved by pressing
494 the arrow keys ($\uparrow$, $\downarrow$, $\leftarrow$, $\rightarrow$).
495 }\parbox[c]{1.25in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=0.8in]{images/cursor1.pdf}}}
496
497 Rapid movement to specific positions is accomplished as listed below:
498 \begin{list}{$\circ$}{}
499 \item {\bf Jump to Sequence {\sl n}:} Type a number {\sl n} then press [S] to
500 move to sequence (row) {\sl n}.
501 \item {\bf Jump to Column {\sl n}:} Type a number {\sl n} then press [C] to move to column {\sl n} in the alignment.  
502 \item {\bf Jump to Residue {\sl n}:} Type a number {\sl n} then press [P] to move to residue number {\sl n} in the current sequence.  
503 \item {\bf Jump to  column {\sl m} row {\sl n}:} Type the column number {\sl m}, a comma, the row number {\sl n} and press [RETURN]. 
504 \end{list}
505 \subsection{The Find Dialog Box}
506 \label{searchfunction}
507 A further option for navigation is to use the {\sl Select $\Rightarrow$
508 Find\ldots} function. This opens a dialog box into which can be entered regular
509 expressions for searching sequences and sequence IDs, or sequence numbers.
510 Hitting the [Find next] button will highlight the first (or next) occurrence of
511 that pattern in the sequence ID panel or the alignment, and will adjust the view
512 in order to display the highlighted region. The Jalview Help provides
513 comprehensive documentation for this function, and a quick guide to the regular
514 expressions that can be used with it.
515 %TODO insert a figure for the Find dialog box
516
517 \exercise{Navigation}{
518 \label{navigationEx}
519 Jalview has two navigation and editing modes: {\bf normal} mode (where editing
520 and navigation are via the mouse) and the {\bf cursor} mode (where editing and
521 navigation are via the keyboard).
522 The {\bf F2} key is used to switch between these two modes. With a Mac, the key
523 combination {\bf Fn and F2} keys are needed, as the {\bf F2} button is
524 often assigned to screen brightness. Jalview always starts up in normal mode.
525
526 \exstep{Load an example alignment from its URL
527 (\url{http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile_2_7.jar}) via the Desktop
528 using {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ from URL} dialog
529 box.
530 (The URL should be stored in its history and clicking on the {\sl down arrow}
531 on the dialog box is an easy way to access it.)}
532 \exstep{Scroll around the alignment using the alignment (vertical) and ruler (horizontal) scroll bars.}
533 \exstep{Find the Overview Window, {\sl View
534 $\Rightarrow$ Overview Window} and open it. Move around the
535 alignment by clicking and dragging the red box in the overview window.}
536 \exstep{Return to the alignment window, look at the status bar (lower left
537 hand corner of the alignment window) as you move the mouse over the alignment. It indicates information about the
538 sequence and residue under the cursor.}
539 \exstep{Press [F2] key, or [Fn]-[F2] on Mac, to enter Cursor mode. Use
540 the direction keys to move the cursor around the alignment.}
541 \exstep{Move to sequence 7 by pressing {\bf 7 S}. Move to column 18 by pressing
542 {\bf 1 8 C}. Move to residue 18 by pressing {\bf 1 8 P}. Note that these can be
543 two different positions if gaps are inserted into the sequence. Move to sequence 5,
544 column 13 by typing {\bf 1 3 , 5} [RETURN].}
545
546 {\bf Note:} To view Jalview's comprehensive on-line help documentations select
547 {\sl Help} in desktop window menu, clicking on {\sl Documentation} will open a
548 Documentation window. Select topics from the navigation panel on the left hand
549 side or use the Search tab to locate specific key words.
550
551 {\sl\bf See the video at: 
552 \url{http://www.jalview.org/Help/Getting-Started}.}
553 }
554
555 \section{Loading Sequences and Alignments}
556 \label{loadingseqs}
557 %Jalview provides many ways to load your own sequences. %For this section of the
558 % tutorial you will need to download the file http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa to a suitable location on your hard drive.
559 \subsection{Drag and Drop}
560         In most operating systems you can drag a file icon from a file browser
561         window and drop it on an open Jalview application window. The file will then be opened as a new alignment window. 
562         %You can try this with the tutorial file you have downloaded. When you have opened the file, close it again by selecting the close control on the window. If you drop an alignment file onto an open alignment window it will be appended.
563         Drag and drop also works when loading data from a URL -
564 simply drag the link or url from the address panel of your browser onto an
565 alignment or the Jalview desktop background and Jalview will load data from the
566 URL directly.
567 %  (Figure \ref{drag})
568 % %[fig 5]
569 % \begin{figure}[htbp]
570 % \begin{center}
571 % \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/drag2.pdf}
572 % \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/drag3.pdf}
573 % \caption{{\bf An alignment can be opened by dragging the file onto the Jalview window. }}
574 % \label{drag}
575 % \end{center}
576 % \end{figure}
577
578 % %\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/drag1.pdf}
579
580
581 \subsection{From a File}
582 Jalview can read sequence alignments from a sequence alignment file. This is a
583 text file, {\bf not} a word processor document. For entering sequences from a
584 wordprocessor document see Cut and Paste  (Section \ref{cutpaste}). Select
585 {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From File} from the main
586 menu (Figure \ref{loadfile}). You will then get a file selection window where
587 you can choose the file to open. Remember to select the appropriate file type.
588 Jalview can automatically identify some sequence file formats.
589
590 %[fig 6]
591 \begin{figure}[htbp]
592 \begin{center}
593 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/loadfilebox.pdf}
594 %\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/loadfilebox2.pdf}
595 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/loadfileboxdrop.pdf}
596 \caption{{\bf Opening an alignment from a file saved on disk. }}
597 \label{loadfile}
598 \end{center}
599 \end{figure}
600
601 \subsection{From a URL}
602 Jalview can read sequence alignments directly from a URL. Please note that the
603 files must be in a sequence alignment format - an HTML alignment or graphics
604 file cannot be read by Jalview.
605 Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From URL} from the
606 main menu and a window will appear asking you to enter the URL (Figure
607 \ref{loadurl}). Jalview will attempt to automatically discover the file format.
608
609 %[fig 7]
610 \begin{figure}[htbp]
611 \begin{center}
612 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/menuloadurl.pdf}
613 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/loadurlbox.pdf}
614 \caption{{\bf Opening an alignment from a URL. }}
615 \label{loadurl}
616 \end{center}
617 \end{figure}
618
619 \subsection{Cut and Paste}
620 \label{cutpaste}
621 Documents such as those produced by Microsoft Word cannot be readily understood
622 by Jalview. The way to read sequences from these documents is to select the
623 data from the document and copy it to the clipboard. There are two ways to
624 do this. One is to right-click on the desktop background, and select the
625 `Paste to new window' option in the menu that appears. The other is to select
626 {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From Textbox} from the
627 main menu, paste the sequences into the text window that will appear, and select
628 {\sl New Window} (Figure \ref{loadtext}). In both cases, presuming that they are
629 in the right format, Jalview will happily read them into a new alignment window.
630 %[fig 8]
631
632 \begin{figure}[htbp]
633 \begin{center}
634 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/menuloadtext.pdf}
635 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/loadtextbox.pdf}
636 \caption{{\bf Opening an alignment from pasted text. }}
637 \label{loadtext}
638 \end{center}
639 \end{figure}
640
641
642 \subsection{From a Public Database}
643 \label{fetchseq}
644 Jalview can retrieve sequences and sequence alignments from the public databases
645 housed at the European Bioinformatics Institute, including Uniprot, Pfam, Rfam
646 and the PDB. Jalview's sequence fetching capabilities allow you to avoid having to
647 manually locate and save sequences from a web page before loading them into
648 Jalview. It also allows Jalview to gather additional metadata provided by the
649 source, such as annotation and database cross-references.
650
651 To begin retrieving data, select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Fetch Sequences \ldots} 
652 from the main menu. A window will then appear (Figure \ref{loadseq}) showing all 
653 the database sources Jalview can access (grouped by the type of database). Once 
654 you've selected the appropriate database by double clicking it or hitting OK, the 
655 database selection window will close and the sequence fetcher for that database 
656 will appear. You can then enter one or several database IDs or accession numbers 
657 separated by a semicolon and press OK. Jalview will then attempt to retrieve them 
658 from the chosen database. Example queries are provided for some databases to test
659 that a source is operational, and can also be used as a guide for the type of 
660 accession numbers understood by the source.
661 % [fig 9]
662 \begin{figure}[htbp]
663 \begin{center}
664 \includegraphics[width=5in]{images/fetchseq.pdf}
665 \caption{{\bf Retrieving sequences from a public database.}}
666 \label{loadseq}
667 \end{center}
668 \end{figure}
669  
670
671 \exercise{Loading Sequences}{
672 \label{load}
673 \exstep{Use {\sl Window $\Rightarrow$ Close All} from the Desktop window menu to
674 close all windows.}
675 %% TODO: omit or combine this exercise
676 %% NB. Edge (MS default browser) doesn't actually allow you to 'save' the page, apparently
677 \exstep{{\bf Loading sequences from URL:} Selecting {\sl File $\Rightarrow$
678 Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From URL} from the Desktop and enter \url{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa} in the box.
679 Click {\sl OK} to load the alignment.}
680
681 %%TODO: omit or combine
682 \exstep{{\bf Loading sequences from a file:} Close all windows using the
683 {\sl Window $\Rightarrow$ Close All} menu option from the Jalview desktop.
684 Then type the same URL (\url{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}) into
685 your web browser and save the fasta file (.fa) file to your desktop using {\sl File
686 $\Rightarrow$ Save Page as}.
687 Open the file you have just saved in Jalview by selecting {\sl File
688 $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From File} from the desktop menu.
689 Select the file and click {\sl OK} to load.}
690
691 \exstep{{\bf Loading sequences by `Drag and Drop' / `Cut and Paste':}
692
693 (i) Drag the alignment.fa file that you have just saved from its folder and
694 drop it onto the Jalview desktop window, the alignment should open.
695
696 (ii) Open
697 \url{http://www.jalview.org/examples/estrogenReceptorProtein.fa} in a web
698 browser. Test the differences
699 between (a) dragging the URL directly from browser onto the Jalview
700 desktop.
701 (If the URL is downloaded, alternatively locate the file in your download
702 directory and drag it onto the desktop.) (b) dragging the URL from
703 browser onto the existing alignment.fa alignment window in the Jalview desktop.
704
705 (iii) Open \url{http://www.jalview.org/examples/estrogenReceptorCdna.fa} in a web
706 browser. Note that this is a cDNA file. Drag the URL from
707 browser onto the estrogenReceptorProtein.fa protein alignment window in
708 the Jalview desktop. A dialogue box opens asking `Would you like to open as split
709 window, with cDNA and protein linked?' select `Split Window' option. A
710 split window opens in the Jalview desktop.
711 }
712
713 \exstep{{\bf The text editor:} 
714
715 (i) Open the alignment.fa file using text editor.
716 Copy the sequence text into the clipboard  using [CTRL]-A and then [CTRL]-C.
717
718 (ii) Move the mouse pointer onto the Jalview desktop window's background and right-click 
719 to open the context window. Select the {\sl Paste to New Window} menu option.
720
721 (iii) In the Jalview desktop menu, select {\sl File
722 $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From Textbox}.
723 Paste the clipboard into the large window using [CTRL]-V. Click {\sl New Window}
724 and the alignment will be loaded.}
725
726 \exstep{{\bf Loading sequences from Public Database:} (i) Select {\sl File
727 $\Rightarrow$ Fetch Sequences...} from the Jalview desktop menu. The {\sl
728 Select Database Retrieval Source} dialog will open listing all the database
729 sources. Select the {\bf PFAM seed} database and click {\sl OK}.
730
731 (ii) The {\sl New
732 Sequence Fetcher} window will open. Enter the accession number {\bf PF03460}
733 and click {\sl OK}.
734 An alignment of about 174 sequences should load.}
735 \exstep{These can be viewed using the Overview window accessible from {\sl View
736 $\Rightarrow$ Overview Window.}}
737 {\bf See the video at:
738 \url{http://www.jalview.org/Help/Getting-Started}} }
739
740 \subsection{Memory Limits}
741 \label{memorylimits}
742 Jalview 2.11 and later will automatically maximise the amount of memory available,
743 but if you are using an earlier version or launching Jalview in a specialised way
744 you may need ensure that you have allocated enough memory to
745 work with your data. On most occasions, Jalview will warn you when you have
746 tried to load an alignment that is too big to fit in to memory (for instance,
747 some of the PFAM alignments are {\bf very} large). You can find out how much
748 memory is available to Jalview with the desktop window's {\sl $\Rightarrow$
749 Tools $\Rightarrow$ Show Memory Usage} function, which enables the display of
750 the currently available memory at the bottom left hand side of the Desktop
751 window's background. Should you need to increase the amount of memory available
752 to Jalview, full instructions are given in the built in documentation (opened by
753 selecting {\sl Help $\Rightarrow$ Documentation}) and on the JVM memory
754 parameters page (\url{http://www.jalview.org/jvmmemoryparams.html}).
755
756 \section{Saving Sequences and Alignments}
757 \label{savingalignments} 
758 \subsection{Saving Alignments} Jalview allows alignments to be saved to file
759 in a variety of formats so they can be restored at a later date, passed to
760 colleagues or analysed in other programs. From the alignment window menu select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save As} and a dialog box
761 will appear (Figure \ref{savealign}). You can navigate to an appropriate
762 directory in which to save the alignment. Jalview will remember the last filename
763 and format used to save (or load) the alignment, enabling you to quickly save
764 the file during or after editing by using the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save}
765 entry. The {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Output To Textbox} menu option allows the alignment to be copied and pasted into
766 other documents or web servers.
767
768 Jalview offers several different formats in which an alignment can be saved.
769 Of these, only the jalview project format (.jar or .jvp) will preserve the colours, groupings and other additional information in the alignment. The other formats
770 produce text files containing just the sequences with no visualization information, although some
771 allow limited annotation and sequence features to be stored (e.g. AMSA).
772 Unfortunately, as far as we are aware only Jalview can read Jalview
773 project files.
774
775 %[fig 10]
776 \begin{figure}[htbp]
777 \begin{center}
778 \parbox[c]{3.0in}{
779 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/saveas.pdf}
780 }
781 \parbox[c]{3in}{
782 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/saveas2.pdf}
783 }
784 \caption{{\bf Saving alignments in Jalview to disk.}}
785 \label{savealign}
786 \end{center}
787 \end{figure}
788
789 \subsection{Jalview Projects}
790 \parbox[c]{4in}{If you wish to save a complete Jalview session rather than
791 just a single alignment (e.g. because you have calculated trees or multiple
792 different alignments) then save your work as a Jalview Project
793 file (.jvp).\footnote{Tip: Ensure that you have allocated plenty of memory to
794 Jalview when working with large alignments in Jalview projects. See Section 
795 \ref{memorylimits} for how to do this.}
796 From the main menu select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save Project} and a file save
797 dialog box will appear. Loading a project will restore Jalview to exactly the
798 view at which the file was saved, complete with all alignments, trees,
799 annotation and displayed structures rendered appropriately.
800 } \parbox[c]{2.3in}{ \centerline {
801 \includegraphics[width=2.2in]{images/saveproj.pdf} }}
802
803 \exercise{Saving Alignments}{
804 \label{save}
805 \exstep{Launch Jalview afresh, or use {\sl Desktop $\Rightarrow$ Window
806 $\Rightarrow$ Close all }.}
807 \exstep{Load the ferredoxin
808 alignment ({\bf PF03460}) from {\bf PFAM (seed)} (see Exercise
809 \ref{load}).
810 } \exstep{
811
812 Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save As} from the alignment window menu. Choose a
813 location into which to save the alignment and select your preferred format. All
814 formats except {\sl  Jalview } jvp can be viewed in a normal text editor (e.g.
815 Notepad) or in a web browser.
816 Enter a file name, select file type and click {\sl Save}.}
817 \exstep{Check this file by closing all windows and opening it with Jalview, or by
818 browsing to it with your web browser.}
819 \exstep{Repeat the previous steps saving the files in different file formats.}
820 \exstep{Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Output to Textbox $\Rightarrow$ FASTA}.
821 Select and copy this alignment to the clipboard using the textbox menu options
822 {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Select All} followed by {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Copy}.
823 The alignment can then be pasted into any application of choice, e.g. a word processor or web form.
824 }
825 \exstep{Ensure at least one alignment window is active in Jalview. Open the
826 overview window {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Overview Window}
827  and click and drag to move the red box to any part of the alignment.
828 Select {\sl File
829 $\Rightarrow$ Save Project} from the desktop window menu and save the project in a
830 suitable folder.}
831
832 \exstep{Close all windows and then load the project {\sl via} the {\sl File
833 $\Rightarrow$ Load Project} menu option. Observe how many of the windows
834 reopen. Are they the same as when they were saved ? } {\bf See the video at:
835 \url{http://www.jalview.org/Help/Getting-Started}.} }
836
837
838 \chapter{Selecting and Editing Sequences }
839 \label{jalviewediting}
840
841 \label{selectingandediting} 
842 Jalview makes extensive use of selections - most of the commands available from
843 its menus operate on the {\sl currently selected region} of the alignment, either to
844 change their appearance or perform some kind of analysis. This section
845 illustrates how to make and use selections and groups.
846
847 \section{Selecting Parts of an Alignment}
848 Selections can be of arbitrary regions in an alignment, one or more complete columns, or one or 
849 more complete sequences.
850 A selected region can be copied and pasted as a new alignment 
851 using the {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Copy} and {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Paste $\Rightarrow$ To New 
852 Alignment}  in the alignment window menu options.
853 {\bf To clear (unselect)  the selection press the [ESC] key.}
854
855 \subsection{Selecting Arbitrary Regions}
856 To select part of an alignment, place the mouse at the top left corner of the region you wish to select. Press and hold the mouse button and drag the mouse to the bottom right corner of the chosen region then release the mouse button. 
857 A dashed red box appears around the selected region (Figure \ref{select}). 
858 %[fig 12]
859
860 \begin{figure}[htbp]
861 \begin{center}
862 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/select1.pdf}
863 \caption{{\bf Selecting a region in an alignment.}}
864 \label{select}
865 \end{center}
866 \end{figure}
867
868 \subsection{Selecting Columns}
869 To select the same residues in all sequences, click and drag along the alignment ruler.
870 This selects the entire column of the alignment. Ranges of positions from the
871 alignment ruler can also be selected by clicking on the first position and then
872 holding down the [SHIFT] key whilst clicking the other end of the selection.
873 Discontinuous regions can be selected by holding down [CTRL] and clicking on
874 positions to add to the column selection. Note that each [CTRL]-Click (PC) or
875 [CMD]-Click (Mac) changes the current selected sequence region to that column,
876 it adds to the column selection.
877 Selected columns are indicated by red highlighting in the ruler bar (Figure \ref{selectcols}).
878 %[fig 13]
879
880 \begin{figure}[htbp]
881 \begin{center}
882 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/select2.pdf}
883 \caption{{\bf Selecting multiple columns in an alignment.} The red highlighting
884 on the alignment ruler marks the selected columns. Note that only the most
885 recently selected column has a dashed-box around it to indicate a region
886 selection. }
887 \label{selectcols}
888 \end{center}
889 \end{figure}
890
891 To select multiple complete sequences, click and drag the mouse down the
892 sequence ID panel. The same techniques can be used as for columns above ([SHIFT]-Click for continuous and [CTRL]-Click (or {\sl 
893 [CMD]-Click} for Mac) to select discontinuous
894 ranges of sequences (Figure \ref{selectrows}).
895 %[fig 14]
896
897 \subsection{Selecting Sequences}
898
899 \begin{figure}[htb]
900 \begin{center}
901 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/select3.pdf}
902 \caption{{\bf Selecting multiple sequences in an alignment.} Use [CTRL] or
903 [SHIFT] to select many sequences at once.}
904 \label{selectrows}
905 \end{center}
906 \end{figure}
907
908
909
910 \subsection{Making Selections in Cursor Mode}
911
912 To define a selection in cursor mode (which is enabled by pressing [F2] when the alignment window is selected),
913 navigate to the top left corner of the proposed selection (using the mouse, the arrow keys, or the keystroke
914 commands described in Section \ref{cursormode}). Pressing the [Q] key marks this as the
915 corner. A red outline appears around the cursor (Figure \ref{cselect}).
916
917 Navigate to the bottom right corner of the proposed selection and press the [M] key. This marks the bottom right corner of the selection. The selection can then be treated in the same way as if it had been created in normal mode.
918
919 \begin{figure}[htbp]
920 \begin{center}
921 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/csel1.pdf}
922 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/csel2.pdf}
923 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/csel3.pdf}
924 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/csel4.pdf}
925 \caption{{\bf Making a selection in cursor mode.} Navigate to the top left
926 corner (left), press [Q], navigate to the bottom right corner and press [M] (right).}
927 \label{cselect}
928 \end{center}
929 \end{figure}
930
931 \begin{figure}
932 \begin{center}
933 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/group1.pdf}
934 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/newgroup.pdf}
935 \caption{{\bf Creating a new group from a selection.}}
936 \label{makegroup}
937 \end{center}
938 \end{figure}
939
940 \subsection{Inverting the Current Selection}
941 The current sequence or column selection can be inverted, using  {\sl Select
942 $\Rightarrow$ Invert Sequence/Column Selection} in the alignment window.
943 Inverting the selection is useful when selecting large regions in an alignment, 
944 simply select the region that is to be kept unselected, and then invert the selection.
945 This may also be useful when hiding large regions in an alignment (see Section \ref{hidingregions}).
946 Instead of selecting the columns and rows that are to be hidden, simply select the 
947 region that is to be kept
948 visible, invert the selection, then select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Hide
949 $\Rightarrow$ Selected Region}.
950
951 \section{Creating Groups}
952 Selections are lost as soon as a different region is selected. Groups can be
953 created which are labeled regions of the alignment. To create a group, first
954 select the region which is to comprise the group. Then click the right mouse
955 button on the selection to bring up a context menu. Select {\sl Selection
956 $\Rightarrow$ Edit New Group $\Rightarrow$ Edit name and description of
957 current group}\footnote{In earlier versions of Jalview, this entry was variously
958 `Group', `Edit Group Name', or `JGroupXXXXX' (Where XXXXX was some serial
959 number).} then enter a name for the group in the dialog box which appears.
960
961 By default the new group will have a box drawn around it. The appearance of the group can be changed (see Section \ref{colours}). 
962 This group will stay defined even when the selection is removed.
963
964
965 \section{Exporting the Current Selection}
966 The current selection can be copied to the clipboard (in PFAM format). It can
967 also be output to a textbox using the output functions in the pop-up menu
968 obtained by right clicking the current selection. The textbox enables quick
969 manual editing of the alignment prior to importing it into a new window (using
970 the {\sl New Window} button) or saving to a file with the {\sl File
971 $\Rightarrow$ Save as } pulldown menu option from the text box.
972
973 \exercise{Making Selections and Groups}{
974 \label{exselect}
975 \exstep{Load the ferredoxin alignment ({\bf PF03460} from {\bf PFAM (seed)}).
976 }
977 \exstep{Selecting an arbitrary region. Choose a residue and place the mouse
978 cursor on it (residue information will show in alignment window status
979 bar).
980 Click and drag the mouse to the bottom-right to create a selection. As you drag,
981 a red box will `rubber band' out to 
982 show the extent of the selection.
983 Release the mouse
984 button and a red box borders the selected region.
985 Press [ESC] to clear this.}
986 \exstep{ Select one sequence by clicking on
987 the sequence ID panel. Note that the sequence ID takes on a highlighted
988 background and a red box appears around the selected sequence. 
989 Hold down [SHIFT] and click another sequence ID a few positions above or below. 
990 Note how the selection expands to include all the sequences between the two positions on which you clicked.
991 Hold down [CTRL] (or [CMD] on Mac) and then click on several sequences' IDs - both selected and
992 unselected. Note how unselected IDs are individually added to the selection and previously selected IDs are 
993 individually deselected.}
994 \exstep{ Select columns by clicking on the Alignment Ruler. Note
995 that the selected column is marked with a red box.
996 Hold down [SHIFT] and click a column beyond. Note the selection expands to
997 include all the sequences between the two positions on which you clicked.}
998
999 \exstep{Enter Cursor mode using [F2], or [Fn]-F2 for Macs.
1000 Navigate to column 59, row 1 by pressing {\bf 5 9 , 1 [RETURN]}.
1001 Press {\bf Q} to mark this position.
1002 Navigate to column 65, row 8 by pressing {\bf 6 5 , 8 [RETURN]}. Press {\bf M}
1003 to complete the selection. Note to clear the selection press the [ESC]
1004 key.}
1005 \exstep{To create a group from the selected the region, click the
1006 right mouse button when mouse is on the selection, this opens a
1007 context menu in the alignment window.
1008
1009 Open the {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Edit New Group $\Rightarrow$ Group Colour
1010 } menu and select {\sl Percentage Identity}.
1011 This will turn the selected region into a group and colour it accordingly.}
1012 \exstep{Hold down [CTRL] and use the mouse to select and deselect sequences in
1013 the alignment by clicking on their Sequence ID label. Note how the group expands
1014 to include newly selected sequences, and the Percentage Identity colouring changes. }
1015 \exstep{ Another way to resize the group is by using the mouse to click and drag
1016 the right-hand edge of the selected group.}
1017
1018 \exstep{The current selection can be exported and saved, place mouse on the text
1019 area and right clicking the mouse to open the Sequence ID context menu.
1020 Select appropriate menu option and pick an output format (eg BLC) from the
1021 {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Output to Textbox \ldots} submenu.
1022 }
1023 \exstep{In the Alignment output window that opens, try manually editing the
1024 alignment before clicking the {\sl New Window} button. This opens the
1025 edited alignment in a new alignment window.} {\bf See the video at:
1026 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
1027 % more? change colouring style. set border colour.
1028 }
1029
1030
1031 \section{Reordering an Alignment}
1032 Sequence reordering is simple. Highlight the sequences to be moved then press the up or down arrow keys ($\uparrow$, $\downarrow$) as appropriate (Figure \ref{reorder}). 
1033 If you wish to move a sequence up past several other sequences it is often quicker to select the group past which you want to move it and 
1034 then move the group rather than the individual sequence.
1035
1036 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1037 \begin{center}
1038 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/move1.pdf}
1039 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/move2.pdf}
1040 \caption{{\bf Reordering the alignment.} The selected sequence moves up one
1041 position on pressing the $\uparrow$ key.}
1042 \label{reorder}
1043 \end{center}
1044 \end{figure}
1045
1046 \exercise{Reordering the Alignment}{
1047 \label{reorderex}
1048 \exstep{Close windows.
1049
1050 Load the ferredoxin alignment ({\bf PF03460} from {\bf PFAM (seed)}).
1051 }
1052 \exstep{Select one of the sequence in the sequence ID panel, use the up and down
1053 arrow keys to alter the sequence's position in the alignment. (Note that
1054 this will not work in cursor mode)}
1055 \exstep{To select and move multiple
1056 sequences, use hold [SHIFT], and select two sequences separated by
1057 one or more un-selected sequences, repeat using the [CTRL] key. Note how
1058 multiple sequences are grouped together when they are re-ordered using the up and down arrow keys.}
1059 {\bf See the video at: \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
1060 }
1061
1062
1063 \section{Hiding Regions}
1064 \label{hidingregions}
1065 It is sometimes convenient to exclude some sequences or residues in the alignment without actually deleting them. 
1066 Jalview allows sequences or alignment columns within a view to be hidden, and this facility has been used to create 
1067 the several different views in the example alignment file that is loaded when Jalview is first started (see Figure \ref{startpage}).
1068
1069 To hide a set of sequences, select them and right-click the mouse on the
1070 selected sequence IDs to bring up the context pop-up menu. Select {\sl Hide
1071 Sequences} and the sequences will be concealed, with a small blue triangle indicating their position (Figure \ref{hideseq}). 
1072 To unhide (reveal) the sequences, right click on the triangle and select {\sl Reveal Sequences} from the context menu.
1073
1074
1075  \begin{figure}[htbp]
1076 \begin{center}
1077 \includegraphics[width=1.9in]{images/hide1.pdf}
1078 \includegraphics[width=2.7in]{images/hide2.pdf}
1079 \includegraphics[width=1.8in]{images/hide3.pdf}
1080 \caption{{\bf Hiding Sequences} Hidden sequences are represented by a small
1081 blue triangle in the sequence ID panel.}
1082 \label{hideseq}
1083 \end{center}
1084 \end{figure}
1085
1086 A similar mechanism applies to columns (Figure \ref{hidecol}). Selected columns
1087 (indicated by a red marker) can be hidden and revealed in the same way {\sl via}
1088 the context pop-up menu by right clicking on the ruler bar. The hidden column
1089 selection is indicated by a small blue triangle in the ruler bar.
1090
1091  \begin{figure}[htbp]
1092 \begin{center}
1093 \includegraphics[width=1.7in]{images/hide4.pdf}
1094 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/hide5.pdf}
1095 \includegraphics[width=1.2in]{images/hide6.pdf}
1096 \caption{{\bf Hiding Columns} Hidden columns are represented by a small blue
1097 triangle in the ruler bar.}
1098 \label{hidecol}
1099 \end{center}
1100 \end{figure}
1101
1102 It is often easier to select the region that you intend to work with, rather
1103 than the regions that you want to hide. In this case, select the required region and use the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Hide
1104 $\Rightarrow$ All but Selected Region } menu entry, or press [SHIFT]-[CTRL]-H
1105 to hide the unselected region.
1106
1107 \subsection{Representing a Group with a Single Sequence}
1108
1109 Instead of hiding a group completely, it is sometimes useful to work with just one representative sequence. 
1110 The {\sl $<$Sequence ID$>$ $\Rightarrow$ Represent group with $<$Sequence ID$>$ } option from the sequence ID pop-up menu enables this variant 
1111 of the hidden groups function. The remaining representative sequence can be visualized and manipulated like any other. 
1112 Note, any alignment edits that affect the sequence will also affect the whole
1113 sequence group.
1114
1115
1116 \begin{figure}[htb]
1117 \begin{center}
1118 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/edit1.pdf}
1119 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/edit2.pdf}
1120 \caption{{\bf Introducing gaps in a single sequence.} Gaps are introduced as the
1121 selected sequence is dragged to the right while pressing and holding [SHIFT].}
1122 \label{gapseq}
1123 \end{center}
1124 \end{figure}
1125
1126 \begin{figure}[htb]
1127 \begin{center}
1128 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/edit3.pdf}
1129 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/edit4.pdf}
1130 \caption{{\bf Introducing gaps in a group.} Gaps are introduced as the selected
1131 group is dragged to the right with [CTRL] pressed.}
1132 \label{gapgroup}
1133 \end{center}
1134 \end{figure}
1135
1136 %% TODO introduce select/hide by annotation here
1137 %% favor coverage of these core interactions (hide, show, select, reorder, multiple view)
1138 \exercise{Hiding and Revealing Regions}{
1139 \label{hidingex}
1140 \exstep{Load the ferredoxin alignment ({\bf PF03460} from {\bf PFAM (seed)}).
1141 }
1142 \exstep{Select a contiguous set of sequences by clicking and dragging on the sequence ID panel.
1143 Right click on the selected sequence IDs to bring up the sequence ID context
1144 menu, select {\sl Hide Sequences}.
1145 }
1146 \exstep{
1147 Right click on the blue triangle indicating hidden sequences and select {\sl
1148 Reveal Sequences} in the panel. (If you have hidden all sequences then you will
1149 need to use the alignment window menu option {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Show $\Rightarrow$ 
1150 All Sequences.}) }
1151 \exstep{
1152 Repeat the process but use a non-contiguous set of sequences. Note that when
1153 multiple regions are hidden you can select either {\sl
1154 Reveal Sequences} to reveal the hidden sequences that were clicked, or {\sl
1155 Reveal All}.
1156 }
1157 \exstep{Repeat the above using columns to hide and reveal columns
1158 instead of sequences.}
1159 \exstep{Select a region of the alignment, and experiment with the {\sl Hide all
1160 but selected region} option in {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Hide $\Rightarrow$ All
1161 but selected region.}} \exstep{Select some sequences, pick one to represent the rest by hovering
1162 the mouse over this sequence. Bring up the Sequence ID context menu by right
1163 clicking and select {\sl (Sequence ID name) $\Rightarrow$ Represent group
1164 with (Sequence ID name )}. To reveal these hidden sequences, right click on the
1165 Sequence ID and in the context menu select {\sl Reveal All}.}
1166 {\bf See the video at:  \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
1167 }
1168
1169
1170
1171 \section{Introducing and Removing Gaps}
1172 The alignment view provides an interactive editing interface, allowing gaps to be inserted or deleted to the left of any position
1173 in a sequence or sequence group. Alignment editing can only be performed whilst in keyboard editing mode (entered by pressing [F2])
1174  or by clicking and dragging residues with the mouse when [SHIFT], [CTRL] or [CMD] (Mac) is held down (which differs from earlier versions of Jalview).
1175
1176
1177 \subsection{Undoing Edits}
1178 Alignment edits can be undone {\sl via} the {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Undo Edit}
1179 alignment window menu option, or [CTRL]-Z. An edit, if undone, may be re-applied
1180 with {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Redo Edit}, or [CTRL]-Y. Note, however, that the
1181 {\sl Undo} function only works for edits to the alignment or sequence ordering.
1182 Colouring of the alignment, showing and hiding of sequences or modification of
1183 annotation that only affect the alignment's display cannot
1184 be undone.
1185
1186 \subsection{Locked Editing}
1187 \label{lockededits}
1188 The Jalview alignment editing model is different to that used in other alignment
1189 editors. Because edits are restricted to the insertion and deletion of gaps to the left of a particular sequence position, 
1190 editing has the effect of shifting the rest of the sequence(s) being edited down or up-stream with respect to the rest of 
1191 alignment. The {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Pad Gaps} option can be enabled to eliminate `ragged edges' at the end of the alignment, 
1192 but does not avoid the `knock-on' effect which is sometimes undesirable. 
1193 However, its effect can be limited by performing the edit within a selected region. 
1194 In this case, gaps will only be removed or inserted within the selected region. 
1195 Edits are similarly constrained when they occur adjacent to a hidden column.
1196
1197 \subsection{Introducing Gaps in a Single Sequence}
1198 To introduce a gap, first select the sequence in the sequence ID panel and
1199 then place the cursor on the residue to the immediate right of where the gap
1200 should appear. Hold down the [SHIFT] key and the left mouse button, then drag the sequence to the right until the required number of gaps 
1201 has been inserted.
1202
1203 One common error is to forget to hold down [SHIFT]. This results in a selection which is one sequence high and one residue long. 
1204 Gaps cannot be inserted in such a selection. The selection can be cleared and editing enabled by pressing the [ESC] key.
1205
1206 \subsection{Introducing Gaps in all Sequences of a Group}
1207 To insert gaps in all sequences in a selection or group, select the
1208 required sequences in the sequence ID panel and then place the mouse cursor on
1209 any residue in the selection or group to the immediate right of the position in which a gap should appear. Hold down the [CTRL] key 
1210 and the left mouse button, then drag the sequences to the right until the required number of gaps has appeared.
1211
1212 Gaps can be removed by dragging the residue to the immediate right of the gap
1213 leftwards whilst holding down [SHIFT] (for single sequences) or [CTRL] (for a group of sequences).
1214
1215 \subsection{Sliding Sequences}
1216 Pressing the [$\leftarrow$] or [$\rightarrow$] arrow keys when one or more
1217 sequences are selected will ``slide'' the entire selected sequences to the left
1218 or right (respectively). Slides occur regardless of the region selection -
1219 which, for example, allows you to easily reposition misaligned subfamilies
1220 within a larger alignment.
1221 % % better idea to introduce hiding sequences, and use the invert selection, hide
1222 % others, to simplify manual alignment construction
1223
1224
1225
1226 \subsection{Editing in Cursor Mode}
1227 Gaps can be easily inserted when in cursor mode (toggled with [F2]) by
1228 pressing [SPACE]. Gaps will be inserted at the cursor, shifting the residue
1229 under the cursor to the right. To insert {\sl n} gaps type {\sl n} and then
1230 press [SPACE]. To insert gaps into all sequences of a group, use [CTRL]-[SPACE]
1231 or [SHIFT]-[SPACE] (both keys held down together).
1232
1233 Gaps can be removed in cursor mode by pressing [BACKSPACE]. First make sure you
1234 have everything unselected by pressing [ESC]. The gap under the cursor will be
1235 removed. To remove {\sl n} gaps, type {\sl n} and then press [BACKSPACE]. Gaps
1236 will be deleted up to the number specified. To delete gaps from all sequences of
1237 a group, press [CTRL]-[BACKSPACE] or [SHIFT]-[BACKSPACE] (both keys held down
1238 together). Note that the deletion will only occur if the gaps are in the same
1239 columns in all sequences in the selected group, and those columns are to the
1240 right of the selected residue.
1241
1242
1243 \exercise{Editing Alignments}
1244   %\label{mousealedit}
1245 % TODO: VERIFY FOR 2.6.1 and 2.7 - NUMBERING/INSTRUCTIONS APPEAR OFF
1246 {
1247 \label{editingalignex}
1248 You are going to manually reconstruct part of the example Jalview
1249 alignment available at
1250  \href{http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile.jvp}
1251  {http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile.jvp}.
1252
1253 {\sl {\bf Mac Users:} Please use the Apple or [CMD] key in place of [CTRL]
1254 for key combinations such as [CTRL]-A. }
1255
1256 Remember to use [CTRL]-Z to undo an edit, or the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$
1257  Reload } function to revert the alignment back to the original version if you
1258  want to start again.
1259
1260 \exstep{ Load the URL
1261 \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/unaligned.fa} which contains part of the
1262 ferredoxin alignment from PF03460.}
1263
1264 \exstep{ Select the first 7 sequences, and press H key to hide them (or right click
1265 on the sequence IDs to open the sequence ID context menu, and select {\sl Hide
1266 Sequences}).}
1267
1268 \exstep{ Select FER3\_RAPSA and FER\_BRANA. Slide the sequences to
1269 the right so the initial residue A lies at column 57 using the $\rightarrow$
1270 key.}
1271
1272 \exstep{ Select FER1\_SPIOL, FER1\_ARATH, FER2\_ARATH, Q93Z60\_ARATH and
1273 O80429\_MAIZE
1274
1275 {\sl Hint: you can do this by pressing [CTRL]-I to invert the sequence selection and then
1276 deselect FER1\_MAIZE), and use the $\rightarrow$ key to slide them to so they
1277 begin at column 5 of the alignment view.}} 
1278
1279 \exstep{ Select all the visible
1280 sequences (those not hidden) in the block by pressing [CTRL]-A.
1281 Insert a single
1282 gap in all selected sequences at column 38 of the alignment by holding [CTRL]
1283 and clicking on the residue R at column 38 in the FER1\_SPIOL, then drag one
1284 column to right.
1285 Insert another gap at column 47 in all sequences in the same way.}
1286
1287 \exstep{ Correct the ferredoxin domain alignment for FER1\_SPIOL by
1288 inserting two additional gaps after the gap at column 47. First press [ESC] to
1289 clear the selection, then hold [SHIFT] and click and drag on the G and move it
1290 two columns to the right.}
1291
1292 \exstep{ Now complete the
1293 alignment of FER1\_SPIOL with a locked edit by pressing [ESC] and select
1294 columns 47 to 57 of the FER1\_SPIOL row. Move the mouse onto the G at column 50,
1295 hold [SHIFT] and drag the G in column 47 of FER1\_SPIOL to the left by one
1296 column to insert a gap at column 57.}
1297
1298 \exstep{ In the next two steps you will complete the alignment of the last two 
1299 sequences.
1300
1301 Select the last two sequences (FER1\_MAIZE and O80429\_MAIZE), then press [SHIFT]
1302 and click and drag the initial methionine of O80429\_MAIZE 5 columns to the right
1303 so it lies at column 10.
1304
1305 Keep holding [SHIFT] and click and drag to insert
1306 another gap at the proline at column 25 (25C in cursor mode). Remove the gap at
1307 column 44, and insert 4 gaps at column 47 (after AAPM).}
1308
1309 \exstep{ Hold [SHIFT] and drag the I at column 39 of FER1\_MAIZE 2 columns to the
1310 right. Remove the gap at FER1\_MAIZE column 49 by [SHIFT]-click and drag left by
1311 one column. Press [ESC] to clear the selection, and then insert three gaps in
1312 FER1\_MAIZE at column 47 by holding [SHIFT] and click and drag the S in FER1\_MAIZE to the right by three columns. Finally,
1313 remove the gap in O80429\_MAIZE at column 56 using [SHIFT]-drag to the left on
1314 56C.}
1315
1316 \exstep{ Use the
1317 {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Undo Edit} and {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Redo Edit} menu
1318 option, or their keyboard shortcuts ([CTRL]-Z and [CTRL]-Y) to step 
1319 backwards and replay the edits you have made.}
1320 }
1321
1322
1323 \exercise{Keyboard Edits}
1324 {
1325 \label{keyboardsex}
1326 This continues on from the previous exercise, and recreates the final part of the example ferredoxin
1327 alignment from the unaligned sequences using Jalview's keyboard editing mode.
1328
1329 {\bf Window users:} Please {\em only use} [SHIFT]-[SPACE] in this
1330 exercise.
1331
1332 {\bf Mac users:} [CTRL]-[SPACE] can also be used instead of [SHIFT]-[SPACE].
1333
1334 \exstep{Load the sequence alignment at
1335 \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/unaligned.fa}, or continue using the
1336 edited alignment.  If you continue from the
1337 previous exercise, first right click on the sequence ID panel and select
1338 {\sl Reveal All}. Enter cursor mode by pressing [F2] (or [Fn]-[F2] (Mac)).}
1339 % TODO: BACKSPACE or DELETE WHEN SEQS ARE SELECTED WILL DELETE ALL SEQS JAL-783
1340
1341 \exstep{Insert 58 gaps at the start of the sequence 1 (FER\_CAPAA). Press
1342 {\sl 58} then {\sl [SPACE]}. }
1343
1344 \exstep{Go down one sequence and select rows 2-5 as a block. Click on the second sequence ID (FER\_CAPAN).
1345  Hold down shift and click on the fifth (FER1\_PEA). }
1346
1347 \exstep{Insert 6 gaps at the start of this group. Go to column 1 row 2 by typing
1348 {\sl 1,2} then press {\sl [RETURN]}. Now insert 6 gaps in all the sequences.
1349 Type {\sl 6} then hold down {\sl [SHIFT]} and press {\sl [SPACE]}.}
1350 \exstep{Now insert one gap at column 34 and another at 38. Insert 3 gaps at 47.
1351 Press {\sl 34C} then {\sl [SHIFT]-[SPACE]}.  Press {\sl 38C} then
1352 [SHIFT]-[SPACE].
1353 Press {\sl 47C} then {\sl 3 [SHIFT-SPACE]} the first through fourth sequences
1354 are now aligned.}
1355 \exstep{The fifth sequence (FER1\_PEA) is poorly aligned. We will delete some gaps and add some new ones. Press {\sl [ESC]} to clear the selection. Navigate to the start of sequence 5 and delete 3 gaps. Press {\sl 1,5 [RETURN]} then {\sl 3 [BACKSPACE]} to delete three gaps. Go to column 31 and delete the gap. Press {\sl 31C [BACKSPACE]} .}
1356 \exstep{ Similarly delete the gap now at column 34, then insert two gaps at
1357 column 38.
1358 Press {\sl 34C [BACKSPACE]  38C 2 [SPACE]}. Delete three gaps at column 44 and
1359 insert one at column 47 by pressing {\sl 44C 3 [BACKSPACE] 47C [SPACE]}.  The top five sequences are 
1360 now aligned.}}
1361
1362
1363 \chapter{Colouring Sequences and Figure Generation}
1364 \label{colouringfigures}
1365 \section{Colouring Sequences}
1366 \label{colours}
1367
1368 Colouring sequences is a key aspect of alignment presentation. Jalview allows
1369 you to colour the whole alignment, or just specific groups. Alignment and
1370 group colours are rendered
1371 {\bf below} any other colours, such as those arising from sequence features
1372 (these are described in Section \ref{featannot}). This means that if you
1373 try to apply one of the colourschemes described in this section, and nothing
1374 appears to happen, it may be that you have sequence feature annotation
1375 displayed, and you may have to disable it using the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$
1376 Show Sequence Features} option before you can see your colourscheme.
1377
1378 There are two main types of colouring styles: {\bf simple static residue}
1379 colourschemes and {\bf dynamic schemes} which use conservation and consensus
1380 analysis to control colouring. {\bf Hybrid colouring} is also possible, where
1381 static residue schemes are modified using a dynamic scheme. The individual schemes are described in Section \ref{colscheme}.
1382
1383 \subsection{Colouring the Whole Alignment}
1384
1385 \parbox[c]{3.75in}{The alignment can be coloured {\sl via} the {\sl Colour} menu option in the alignment window. Selecting the colour scheme causes all residues to be coloured. The menu is divided into three sections. The first section gives options for the behaviour of the menu options, the second lists static and dynamic colourschemes available for selection. The last gives options for making hybrid colourschemes using conservation shading or colourscheme thresholding. 
1386
1387 }\parbox[c]{3in}{
1388 \centerline {
1389 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/colour2.pdf}
1390 }
1391 }
1392
1393 \subsection{Colouring a Group or Selection}
1394
1395 Selections or groups can be coloured in two ways. The first is {\sl via} the Alignment Window's {\sl Colour} menu as stated above,
1396  after first ensuring that the {\sl Apply Colour To All Groups} flag is {\bf
1397  not} selected.
1398  This must be turned {\bf off} specifically as it is {\bf on} by default. 
1399  When unticked, selections from the Colours menu will only change the colour for residues in the current selection, 
1400  or the alignment view's ``background colourscheme'' when no selection exists.
1401
1402 The second method is to select sequences and right click mouse to open pop-up
1403 menu and select {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Edit New Group $\Rightarrow$ Group
1404 Colour} from context menu options
1405 (Figure \ref{colgrp}). This only changes the colour of the current selection or group.
1406
1407 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1408 \begin{center}
1409 %TODO update group_col.pdf to show latest jalview group edit submenu
1410 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/group_col.pdf}
1411 \caption{{\bf Colouring a group via the context menu.}}
1412 \label{colgrp}
1413 \end{center}
1414 \end{figure}
1415
1416 \subsection{Shading by Conservation}
1417 For many colour schemes, the intensity of the colour in a column can be scaled
1418 by the degree of amino acid property conservation. Selecting {\sl Colour
1419 $\Rightarrow$ By Conservation} enables this mode, and {\sl Modify
1420 Conservation Threshold...} brings up a selection box (the {\sl Conservation
1421 Colour Increment} dialog box) allowing the alignment colouring to be modified.
1422 Selecting a higher value limits colouring to more highly conserved columns (Figure \ref{colcons}).
1423
1424  \begin{figure}[htbp]
1425 \begin{center}
1426 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/colourcons1.pdf}
1427 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/colourcons3.pdf}
1428 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/colourcons5.pdf}
1429 \caption{{\bf Conservation Shading} The density of the ClustalX style residue
1430 colouring is controlled by the conservation threshold. The effect of 0\% (left), 50\% (center) and 100\% (right) thresholds are shown.
1431 }
1432 \label{colcons}
1433 \end{center}
1434 \end{figure}
1435
1436 \subsection{Thresholding by Percentage Identity}
1437
1438 `Thresholding' is another hybrid colour model where a residue is only coloured
1439 if it is not excluded by an applied threshold. Selecting {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ Above Identity Threshold} brings up a selection box with a slider controlling the minimum percentage identity threshold to be applied. Selecting a higher threshold (by sliding to the right) limits the colouring to columns with a higher percentage identity (as shown by the Consensus histogram in the annotation panel).
1440
1441 \subsection{Colouring by Annotation}
1442 \label{colourbyannotation}
1443 \parbox[c]{3.2in}{
1444 Any of the {\bf quantitative} annotations shown on an alignment can be used to
1445 threshold or shade the whole alignment.\footnote{Please remember to turn off
1446 Sequence Feature display to see the shading} 
1447
1448 The {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ By
1449 Annotation} option opens a dialog which allows you to select which annotation
1450 to use, the minimum and maximum shading colours or whether the original
1451 colouring should be thresholded (the `Use original colours' option).
1452
1453 Default settings for minimum and maximum colours can be set in the Jalview
1454 Desktop's preferences.  
1455 }\parbox[c]{3in}{
1456 \centerline{\includegraphics[width=2.8in]{images/col_byannot.pdf}}}
1457
1458 The {\bf per Sequence} option in the {\bf Colour By Annotation} dialog
1459 allows each sequence to be shaded according to sequence associated annotation
1460 rows, such as protein disorder scores. This functionality is described further
1461 in Section \ref{protdisorderpred}.
1462
1463 \subsection{Colour Schemes} 
1464
1465 \label{colscheme}
1466 Full details on each colour scheme can be found in the Jalview on-line help. A brief description of each one is provided below:
1467
1468 \subsubsection{Clustalx}
1469
1470
1471  \parbox[c]{3.5in}{This is an emulation of the default colourscheme used for alignments in ClustalX, a graphical interface for the ClustalW multiple sequence alignment program. Each residue in the alignment is assigned a colour if the amino acid profile of the alignment at that position meets some minimum criteria specific for the residue type. }
1472 \parbox[c]{3in}{\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_clustalx.pdf}}
1473
1474 \subsubsection{Blosum62 Score}
1475
1476 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{Gaps are coloured white. If a residue matches the consensus sequence residue at that position it is coloured dark blue. If it does not match the consensus residue but the Blosum62 matrix gives a positive score, it is coloured light blue.}
1477 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1478 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_blosum62.pdf}
1479 }
1480
1481 \subsubsection{Percentage Identity}
1482 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1483 The Percentage Identity option colours the residues (boxes and/or text) according to the percentage of the residues in each column that agree with the consensus sequence. Only the residues that agree with the consensus residue for each column are coloured.
1484 }
1485 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1486 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_percent.pdf}
1487 }
1488
1489 \subsubsection{Zappo}
1490 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1491 The residues are coloured according to their physicochemical properties. The physicochemical groupings are Aliphatic/hydrophobic, Aromatic, 
1492 Positive, Negative, Hydrophillic, Conformationally special, and Cyst(e)ine.
1493 }
1494 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1495 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_zappo.pdf}
1496 }
1497
1498 \subsubsection{Taylor}
1499
1500 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1501 This colour scheme was devised by Willie Taylor and an entertaining description of its origin can be found in Protein Engineering, 
1502 Vol 10 , 743-746 (1997).
1503 }
1504 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1505 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_taylor.pdf}
1506 }
1507
1508 \subsubsection{Hydrophobicity}
1509 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1510 Residues are coloured according to the hydrophobicity table of Kyte, J., and Doolittle, R.F., J. Mol. Biol. 1157, 105-132, 1982. The most hydrophobic residues are coloured red and the most hydrophilic ones are coloured blue.
1511 }
1512 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1513 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_hydro.pdf}
1514 }
1515
1516 \subsubsection{Helix Propensity}
1517
1518 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1519 The residues are coloured according to their Chou-Fasman\footnote{\label{chou-fasman}Chou, PY and Fasman, GD. Annu Rev Biochem. 1978;47:251-76.} helix propensity. The highest propensity is magenta, the lowest is green.
1520 }
1521 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1522 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_helix.pdf}
1523 }
1524
1525 \subsubsection{Strand Propensity}
1526
1527 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1528 The residues are coloured according to their Chou-Fasman\textsuperscript{\ref{chou-fasman}} Strand propensity. The highest propensity is Yellow, the lowest is blue.
1529 }
1530 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1531 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_strand.pdf}
1532 }
1533
1534
1535
1536 \subsubsection{Turn Propensity}
1537 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1538 The residues are coloured according to their Chou-Fasman\textsuperscript{\ref{chou-fasman}} turn propensity. The highest propensity is red, the lowest is cyan.
1539 }
1540 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1541 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_turn.pdf}
1542 }
1543
1544 \subsubsection{Buried Index}
1545 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{
1546 The residues are coloured according to their Chou-Fasman\textsuperscript{\ref{chou-fasman}} burial propensity. The highest propensity is blue, the lowest is green.
1547 }
1548 \parbox[c]{3in}{
1549 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_buried.pdf}
1550 }
1551  
1552
1553 \subsubsection{Nucleotide}
1554 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{ Residues are coloured with four colours corresponding to the
1555 four nucleotide bases. All non ACTG residues are uncoloured. See Section
1556 \ref{workingwithnuc} for further information about working with nucleic acid
1557 sequences and alignments.
1558 } \parbox[c]{3in}{ \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_nuc.pdf} }
1559
1560 \subsubsection{Purine/Pyrimidine}
1561 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{ Residues are coloured according to whether the corresponding
1562 nucleotide bases are purine (magenta) or pyrimidine (cyan) based. All non ACTG
1563 residues are uncoloured. For further information about working with nucleic acid
1564 sequences and alignments, see Section \ref{workingwithnuc}.
1565 %and Section \ref{workingwithrna}
1566
1567 } \parbox[c]{3in}{ \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_purpyr.pdf} }
1568
1569 \subsubsection{By RNA Helices}
1570 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{ Columns are coloured according to their assigned RNA helix as
1571 defined by a secondary structure annotation line on the alignment. Colours for
1572 each helix are randomly assigned, and option only available when an RNA
1573 secondary structure row is present on the alignment. 
1574 % For more details see Section \ref{workingwithrna} 
1575 } \parbox[c]{3in}{
1576 \includegraphics[width=2.75in]{images/col_rnahelix.pdf} }
1577
1578 \subsubsection{User Defined}
1579 This dialog allows the user to create any number of named colour schemes at
1580 will. Any residue may be assigned any colour. The colour scheme can then be
1581 named. If you save the colour scheme, this name will appear on the Colour menu
1582 (Figure \ref{usercol}).
1583
1584
1585 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1586 \begin{center}
1587 \includegraphics[width=2.1in]{images/col_user1.pdf}
1588 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/col_user2.pdf}
1589 \includegraphics[width=2.1in]{images/col_user3.pdf}
1590 \caption{{\bf Creation of a user defined colour scheme.} Residue types are
1591 assigned colours (left). The profile is saved (center) and can then be accessed {\sl via} the {\sl Colour} menu (right).}
1592 \label{usercol}
1593 \end{center}
1594 \end{figure}
1595
1596 \exercise{Colouring Alignments}{
1597 \label{color}
1598 Note: Ensure that the {\sl Apply Colour
1599 To All Groups} flag is not selected in {\sl Colour} menu in the alignment window.
1600 % patch needed for 2.10 This must be turned {\sl off} specifically as it is on
1601 % by default.
1602
1603 \exstep{Open a sequence alignment, for example the PFAM domain PF03460 in PFAM
1604 seed database. Select the alignment menu option {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$
1605 Clustalx} and note the colour change. Now try all the other colour schemes in the {\sl Colour} menu. 
1606 Note that some colour schemes do not colour all residues.}
1607 \exstep{Colour the alignment using {\sl Colour  $\Rightarrow$ Blosum62 score}. Select a group
1608 of around 4 similar sequences. Use the context menu (right click on the group)
1609 option {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Edit New Group $\Rightarrow$ Group Colour
1610 $\Rightarrow$ Blosum62 score} to colour the selection. Notice how some residues which
1611 were not coloured are now coloured. The calculations performed for dynamic
1612 colouring schemes like Blosum62 are based on the selected group,
1613 not the whole alignment. (This also explains the colouring changes observed in exercise
1614 \ref{exselect} during the group selection step).}
1615 \exstep{Keeping the same selection as before, colour the complete alignment except
1616 the group using {\sl Colour  $\Rightarrow$ Taylor}.
1617 Select the menu option  {\sl Colour  $\Rightarrow$ By Conservation}. 
1618 Slide the selector in the Conservation Colour Increment dialog box from side
1619 to side and observe the changes in the alignment colouring in the selection and in the complete alignment.}
1620 Note: Feature colours overlay residue colouring. The features colours can be
1621 toggled off by going to {\sl View  $\Rightarrow$ Show Sequence Features}.
1622
1623 {\bf See the video at: \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
1624 }
1625
1626
1627 \exercise{User Defined Colour Schemes}{
1628 \label{colouex}
1629 \exstep{Load a sequence alignment PF03460 from the PFAM
1630 seed database. Ensure that the {\sl Colour  $\Rightarrow$
1631 None} is selected. Select the alignment menu option {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$
1632 User Defined}.
1633 A dialog window will open.}
1634 \exstep{Click on an amino acid button, then select a colour for that amino acid. Repeat till all amino acids are coloured to your liking.}
1635 \exstep{ Insert a name for the colourscheme in the appropriate field and click {\sl Save Scheme}. You will be prompted for a file name in which to save the colour scheme. The dialog window can now be closed.}
1636 \exstep{The new colour scheme appears in the list of colour schemes in the {\sl Colour} menu and can be selected in future Jalview sessions.
1637
1638 {\bf See the video at:
1639 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}} }
1640
1641 \exercise{Alignment Layout}{
1642 \label{exscreen}
1643 \exstep{Start Jalview and open the URL \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile.jvp}. 
1644 Select {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Wrap} from the alignment window menu. 
1645 Experiment with the various options from the {\sl Format} menu, for example adjust the ruler placement, 
1646 sequence ID format and so on. }
1647 \exstep{Hide all the annotation rows by toggling {\sl Annotations $\Rightarrow$
1648 Show Annotations} from the alignment window menu. Reveal the annotations by selecting the same menu option.} \exstep{Deselect {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Wrap}. Right click on the
1649 annotation row labels to bring up the context menu, then select {\sl
1650 Hide This Row}. Bring up the context menu again and select {\sl
1651 Show All Hidden Rows} to reveal them.}
1652 \exstep{Annotations can be reordered by clicking on the annotations name and
1653 dragging the row to the desired position. Click on the {\sl Consensus} row and drag it upwards to just above {\sl Quality}. 
1654 The rows should now be reordered. Features and annotations are covered in more detail in Section \ref{featannot}.}
1655 \exstep{Move the mouse to the top left hand corner of the annotation labels - 
1656 a up/down arrow symbol should appear - when this is shown, the height of the {\sl Annotation Area} can be changed 
1657 by clicking and dragging this icon up or down.}
1658 \bf See the video at:
1659 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
1660
1661 \section{Formatting and Graphics Output}
1662 \label{layoutandoutput}
1663 Jalview is a WYSIWIG alignment editor. This means that for most kinds of graphics output, 
1664 the layout that is seen on screen will be the same as what is outputted in an
1665 exported graphics file.
1666 It is therefore important to pick the right kind of display layout prior to generating figures. 
1667
1668 \subsection{Multiple Alignment Views}
1669
1670 Jalview is able to create multiple independent visualizations of the same underlying alignment - these are called {\bf Views}. 
1671 Because each view displays the same underlying data, any edits performed in one view will update the alignment or annotation visible in all views.
1672
1673 \parbox[c]{4in}{Alignment views are created using the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$
1674 New View} option of the alignment window or by pressing [CTRL]-T.
1675 This will create a new view with the same groups, alignment layout and display options as the current one. 
1676 Pressing G key will gather together Views as named tabs on the alignment window, and pressing X key will expand gathered Views so they can be viewed 
1677 simultaneously in their own separate windows.} \parbox[c]{2.75in}{
1678 \begin{center}\centerline{
1679 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/mulv_tabs.pdf}}
1680 \end{center}
1681 }
1682
1683 To delete a view, press [CTRL]-W (or [CMD]-W (Mac)).
1684 To rename a view, right click the view's name, this open the Enter View Name dialogue box, enter the desired name.
1685 % JBPNote make an excercise on views ?
1686
1687 \subsection{Alignment Layout}
1688 Jalview provides two screen layout modes, unwrapped (the default) where the alignment is in one long line across the window, and wrapped, 
1689 where the alignment is on multiple lines, each the width of the window. Most layout options are controlled by the Format menu option in the 
1690 alignment window, and control the overall look of the alignment in the view (rather than just a selected region).
1691
1692 \subsubsection{Wrapped Alignments}
1693 Wrapped alignments can be toggled on and off using the {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Wrap} menu option (Figure \ref{wrap}). Note that 
1694 the annotation tracks are also wrapped. Wrapped alignments are great for publications and presentations but are of limited use when 
1695 working with large numbers of sequences. 
1696
1697 If annotations are not all visible in wrapped mode, expand the alignment window to view them. Note that alignment annotation 
1698 (see Section \ref{featannot}) cannot be interactively created or edited in wrapped mode, and selection of large regions is difficult. 
1699 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1700 \begin{center}
1701 \parbox[c]{2in}{\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/wrap1.pdf}}
1702 \parbox[c]{4in}{\includegraphics[width=4in]{images/wrap2.pdf}}
1703 \caption{{\bf Wrapping the alignment.}}
1704 \label{wrap}
1705 \end{center}
1706 \end{figure}
1707
1708
1709 \subsubsection{Fonts}
1710
1711 \parbox[c]{4in}{The text appearance in a view can be modified {\sl via} the {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Font\ldots} alignment window menu. This setting 
1712 applies for all alignment and annotation text except for that displayed in tool-tips. Additionally, font size and spacing can be adjusted rapidly by 
1713 clicking the middle mouse button and dragging across the alignment window.}
1714 \parbox[c]{2in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=1.75in]{images/font.pdf}}}
1715
1716 \subsubsection{Numbering and Label Justification}
1717 Options in the {\sl Format} menu are provided to control the alignment view, and provide a range of options to control the display of sequence and 
1718 alignment numbering, the justification of sequence IDs and annotation row column labels on the annotation rows shown below the alignment.
1719
1720 \subsubsection{Alignment and Group Colouring and Appearance}
1721 The display of hidden row/column markers and gap characters can be turned off with {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Show Hidden Markers} and 
1722 {\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Show Gaps}, respectively. The {\sl Text} and {\sl Colour Text} option controls the display of sequence text and the application of alignment and group colouring to it. {\sl Boxes } controls the display of the background area behind each residue that is coloured by the applied coloursheme.  
1723
1724 \subsubsection{Highlighting Nonconserved Symbols}
1725 The alignment layout and group sub-menu both contain an option to hide
1726 conserved symbols from the alignment display ({\sl Format $\Rightarrow$ Show
1727 nonconserved } in the alignment window or {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Group
1728 $\Rightarrow$ Show Nonconserved} by right clicking on a group). This mode is useful when working with
1729 alignments that exhibit a high degree of homology, because Jalview will only
1730 display gaps or sequence symbols that differ from the consensus for each
1731 column, and render all others with a `.'.
1732 %TODO add a graphic to illustrate this.
1733
1734 \subsection{Annotation Ordering and Display}
1735 % TODO: describe consensus, conservation, quality user preferences, and group
1736 % annotation preferences.
1737 The annotation lines which appear below the sequence alignment are described in
1738 detail in Section \ref{featannot}. They can be hidden by toggling the {\sl Annotations
1739 $\Rightarrow$ Show annotations} menu option. Additionally, each annotation line
1740 can be hidden and revealed in the same way as sequences {\sl via} the
1741 pop-up context menu on the annotation name panel (Figure \ref{annot}).
1742 Annotations can be reordered by dragging the annotation line label on the annotation label panel. Placing the
1743 mouse over the top annotation label brings up a resize icon on the left. When this is
1744 displayed, click-dragging up and down provides either more space in the alignment window for viewing the annotations, or 
1745 less space for the sequence alignment.
1746
1747 \begin{figure}
1748 \begin{center}
1749 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/annot1.pdf}
1750 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/annot2.pdf}
1751 \caption{{\bf Hiding Annotations} Annotations can either be hidden from the {\sl
1752 Annotations} menu (left) or individually from the context menu opened by right clicking their label (right).}
1753 \label{annot}
1754 \end{center}
1755 \end{figure}
1756
1757 %%TODO: multiple views - simple edits - observe changes in other views.
1758
1759
1760 \subsection{Graphical Output}
1761 \label{figuregen}
1762 \parbox[c]{4in}{Jalview allows alignments figures to be exported in different formats, each of which is suited to a particular purpose. 
1763 Image export is {\sl via} the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Image $\Rightarrow$ \ldots } alignment window menu option. }
1764 \parbox[c]{2in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/image.pdf}}}
1765
1766 \subsubsection{HTML}
1767
1768 \parbox[c]{4in}{HTML is the format used by web pages. Jalview outputs the
1769 alignment as a 'Scalable Vector Graphics' (or SVG) file with all the colours and fonts as seen, which is in turn embedded as a 
1770 scrollable component within an HTML page.
1771 %% Functionality lost in 2.9 Any additional annotation will also be embedded as sensitive areas on the page, such as URL links for each sequence's ID label. 
1772 This file can then be viewed directly with any web browser. Unwrapped alignments will produce a very wide page. Export options allow 
1773 original data to be embedded in the HTML file as BioJSON.\footnote{BioJSON was introduced in Jalview 2.9 and fully described 
1774 at \url{https://jalview.github.io/biojson/}}}
1775 \parbox[c]{3.5in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=3in]{images/image_html.pdf}}}
1776
1777 \subsubsection{EPS}
1778 \parbox[c]{4in}{EPS is Encapsulated Postscript. {\bf It is the format of choice
1779 for publications and posters} as it gives the highest quality output of any of
1780 the image types. It can be scaled to any size, so will still look good on an A0
1781 poster.
1782 This format can be read by most good presentation and graphics packages such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape.
1783 }
1784 \parbox[c]{4in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/image_eps.pdf}}
1785 \par \centerline{Zoom Detail of EPS image.}}
1786
1787 \subsubsection{PNG}
1788 \parbox[c]{4in}{
1789 PNG is Portable Network Graphics. This output option produces an image that can be easily included in web pages and incorporated in 
1790 presentations using e.g. Powerpoint or Open Office. It is a bitmap image so does not scale and is unsuitable for use on posters, 
1791 or in publications.
1792
1793 For submission of alignment figures to journals, please use EPS\footnote{If the journal complains, {\em insist}.}.
1794 }
1795 \parbox[c]{4in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/image_png.pdf}}
1796 \par \centerline{Zoom Detail of PNG image.}}
1797
1798  \exercise{Graphical Output}{
1799  \label{graphicex}
1800 \exstep{Load the example Jalview Jar file in Exercise \ref{exscreen}. 
1801 Customise it how you wish but leave it unwrapped. 
1802 Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Image $\Rightarrow$ HTML} from the alignment menu. 
1803 Save the file and open it in your favoured web browser.  }
1804 \exstep{Wrap the alignment and export the image to HTML again. Compare the two
1805 images. (Note that the exported image matches the format displayed in the
1806 alignment window but {\bf annotations are not exported}).}
1807 \exstep{Export the alignment using the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Image $\Rightarrow$ PNG} menu option. 
1808 Open the file in an image viewer that allows zooming such as Paint or Photoshop (Windows), or Preview (Mac OS X) and zoom in. 
1809 Notice that the image is a bitmap and it becomes pixelated when zoomed. 
1810 (Note that the {\bf annotation lines are included} in the image.)}
1811 \exstep{Export the alignment using the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Image
1812 $\Rightarrow$ EPS} menu option. Open the file in a suitable program such as
1813 Photoshop, Illustrator, Inkscape, Ghostview, Powerpoint (Windows), or
1814 Preview (Mac OS X). Zoom in and note that the image has near-infinite
1815 resolution.}
1816 \exstep{Experiment with Jalview's other output options: try exporting an alignment view as 'BioJS', which employs the BioJS Multiple Sequence Alignment viewer. When would you use this type of export option ?}
1817 \exstep{Working with embedded BioJSON data. Drag and drop (or load via the file browser) the 'BioJS' HTML file in the previous step. Compare the original and imported alignment views - are there differences ?}
1818 \bf See the video at:
1819 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.
1820 }
1821
1822 % left out for Glasgow 2016
1823 % \newpage
1824
1825 % \section{Summary - the rest of the manual}
1826
1827 % The first few chapters have covered the basics of Jalview operation: from
1828 % starting the program, importing, exporting, selecting, editing and colouring
1829 % aligments, to the generation of figures for publication, presentation and web
1830 % pages.
1831
1832 % The remaining chapters in the manual cover:
1833
1834 % \begin{list}{$\circ$}{}
1835 % \item{Chapter \ref{featannot} covers the creation, manipulation and visualisation
1836 % of sequence and alignment annotation, and retrieval of sequence and feature data
1837 % from databases.}
1838 % \item {Chapter \ref{msaservices} explores the range of multiple alignment
1839 % programs offered via Jalview's web services, and introduces the use of
1840 % AACon for protein multiple alignment conservation analysis.}
1841 % \item {Chapter \ref{alignanalysis} introduces Jalview's built in tools for
1842 % multiple sequence alignment analysis, including trees, PCA, and alignment
1843 % conservation analysis. }
1844 % \item {Chapter \ref{3Dstructure} demonstrates the structure visualization
1845 % capabilities of Jalview.}
1846 % \item {Chapter \ref{proteinprediction} introduces protein sequence based
1847 % secondary structure and disorder prediction tools, including JPred.}
1848 % \item {Chapter \ref{dnarna} covers the special functions and
1849 % visualization techniques for working with RNA alignments and protein coding
1850 % sequences.}
1851 % \item {Chapter \ref{jvwebservices} provides instructions on the
1852 % installation of your own Jalview web services.}
1853 % \end{list}
1854
1855 \chapter{Annotation and Features}
1856 \label{featannot}
1857 Annotations and features are additional information that is
1858 overlaid on the sequences and the alignment.
1859 Generally speaking, annotations reflect properties of the alignment as a
1860 whole, often associated
1861 with columns in the alignment. Features are often associated with specific
1862 residues in the sequence.
1863
1864 Annotations are shown below the alignment in the annotation panel, the
1865 properties are often based on the alignment.
1866 Conversely, sequence features are properties of the individual sequences, so they do not change with the alignment, 
1867 but are shown mapped on to specific residues within the alignment. 
1868
1869 Features and annotation can be interactively created, or retrieved from external
1870 data sources. Webservices like JPred (see \ref{jpred}) can be used to
1871 analyse a given sequence or alignment and generate annotation for it.
1872
1873
1874 \section{Conservation, Quality, Consensus and other Annotation}
1875 \label{annotationintro}
1876 Jalview automatically calculates several quantitative alignment annotations
1877 which are displayed as histograms below the multiple sequence alignment columns. 
1878 Conservation, quality and consensus scores are examples of dynamic
1879 annotation, so as the alignment changes, they change along with it.
1880 The scores can be used in the hybrid colouring options to shade the alignments. 
1881 Mousing over a conservation histogram reveals a tooltip with more information.
1882
1883 These annotations can be hidden and deleted via the context menu linked to the
1884 annotation row; but they are only created on loading an alignment. If they are
1885 deleted then the alignment should be saved and then reloaded to restore them.
1886 Jalview provides a toggle to autocalculate a consensus sequence upon editing. This is normally selected by default, but can be turned off for
1887 large alignments {\sl via} the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Autocalculate
1888 Consensus} menu option if the interface is too slow.
1889
1890 \subsubsection{Conservation Annotation}
1891
1892 Alignment conservation annotation is quantitative numerical index reflecting the
1893 conservation of the physico-chemical properties for each column of the alignment. 
1894 The calculation is based on AMAS method of multiple sequence alignment analysis (Livingstone C.D. and Barton G.J. (1993) CABIOS Vol. 9 No. 6 p745-756), 
1895 with identities scoring highest, and amino acids with substitutions in the same physico-chemical class have next highest score. 
1896 The score for each column is shown below the histogram. 
1897 The conserved columns with a score of 11 are indicated by '*'.
1898 Columns with a score of 10 have mutations but all properties are conserved are marked with a '+'.
1899
1900 \subsubsection{Consensus Annotation}
1901
1902 Alignment consensus annotation reflects the percentage of the different residue
1903 per column. By default this calculation includes gaps in columns, gaps can be ignored via the Consensus label context 
1904 menu to the left of the consensus bar chart. 
1905 The consensus histogram can be overlaid
1906 with a sequence logo that reflects the symbol distribution at each column of
1907 the alignment. Right click on the Consensus annotation row and select the {\sl Show
1908 Logo} option to display the Consensus profile for the group or alignment.
1909 Sequence logos can be enabled by default for all new alignments {\sl via} the
1910 Visual tab in the Jalview desktop's preferences dialog box.
1911
1912 \subsubsection{Quality Annotation}
1913
1914 Alignment quality annotation is an ad-hoc measure of the likelihood of observing
1915 the mutations (if any) in a particular column of the alignment. The quality score is calculated for each column in an alignment by summing, 
1916 for all mutations, the ratio of the two BLOSUM 62 scores for a mutation pair and each residue's conserved BLOSUM62 score (which is higher). 
1917 This value is normalised for each column, and then plotted on a scale from 0 to 1.
1918
1919 \subsubsection{Occupancy Annotation}
1920
1921 Alignment occupancy simply reflects the number of residues aligned at each column
1922 in the multiple sequence alignment. To see this annotation you may first need to enable it by ticking the {\sl Occupancy} check-box
1923 in the {\sl Visual} tab in Jalview's {\sl Preferences} before opening an alignment. Occupancy is particularly useful in conjunction with
1924 the {\sl Select/Hide by Annotations} dialog since it allows the view to be filtered to exclude regions of the alignment with a high proportion of gaps.
1925
1926 \subsubsection{Group Associated Annotation}
1927 \label{groupassocannotation}
1928 Group associated consensus and conservation annotation rows reflect the
1929 sequence variation within a particular group. Their calculation is enabled
1930 by selecting the {\sl Group Conservation} or {\sl Group Consensus} options in
1931 the {\sl Annotation $\Rightarrow$ Autocalculated Annotation } submenu of the
1932 alignment window. 
1933
1934 \subsection{Creating User Defined Annotation}
1935
1936 To create a new annotation row, right click on the annotation label panel and select the {\sl Add New Row} menu option (Figure \ref{newannotrow}).
1937 A dialog box appears. Enter the label to use for this row and a new row will appear.
1938
1939 To create a new annotation, first select all the positions to be annotated on the appropriate row. 
1940 Right-clicking on this selection brings up the context menu which allows the insertion of graphics for secondary structure ({\sl Helix} or {\sl Sheet}), 
1941 text {\sl Label} and the colour in which to present the annotation (Figure \ref{newannot}). On selecting {\sl Label} a dialog box will appear, 
1942 requesting the text to place at that position. After the text is entered, the selection can be removed and the annotation becomes clearly 
1943 visible\footnote{When annotating a block of positions, the text can be partly obscured by the selection highlight. Pressing the  [ESC] key clears 
1944 the selection and the label is then visible.}. Annotations can be coloured or deleted as desired.
1945
1946 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1947 \begin{center}
1948 \includegraphics[width=1.3in]{images/annots1.pdf}
1949 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/annots2.pdf}
1950 \caption{{\bf Creating a new annotation row.} Annotation rows can be reordered by dragging them to the desired place.}
1951 \label{newannotrow}
1952 \end{center}
1953 \end{figure}
1954
1955 \begin{figure}[htbp]
1956 \begin{center}
1957 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/annots3.pdf}
1958 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/annots4.pdf}
1959 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/annots5.pdf}
1960 \caption{{\bf Creating a new annotation.} Annotations are created from a selection on the annotation row and can be coloured as desired.}
1961 \label{newannot}
1962 \end{center}
1963 \end{figure}
1964
1965 \subsection{Automated Annotation of Alignments and Groups}
1966
1967 On loading a sequence alignment, Jalview will normally\footnote{Automatic
1968 annotation can be turned off in the {\sl Visual } tab in the {\sl Tools
1969 $\Rightarrow$ Preferences } dialog box.} calculate a set of automatic annotation
1970 rows which are shown below the alignment. For nucleotide sequence alignments,
1971 only an alignment consensus row will be shown, but for amino acid sequences,
1972 alignment quality (based on BLOSUM 62) and physicochemical conservation will
1973 also be shown. Conservation is calculated according to Livingstone and
1974 Barton\footnote{{\sl ``Protein Sequence Alignments: A Strategy for the
1975 Hierarchical Analysis of Residue Conservation." } Livingstone C.D. and Barton
1976 G.J. (1993) {\sl CABIOS } {\bf 9}, 745-756}.
1977 Consensus is the modal residue (or {\tt +} where there is an equal top residue).
1978 The inclusion of gaps in the consensus calculation can be toggled by
1979 right-clicking on the Consensus label and selecting {\sl Ignore Gaps in
1980 Consensus} from the pop-up context menu located with consensus annotation row.
1981 Quality is a measure of the inverse likelihood of unfavourable mutations in the alignment. Further details on these
1982 calculations can be found in the on-line documentation.
1983
1984
1985 \exercise{Annotating Alignments}{
1986   \label{annotatingalignex}
1987 \exstep{Load the alignment at \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}. 
1988 Right-click on the label name of the {\sl Conservation} annotation row to
1989 bring up the context menu and select {\sl Add New Row}. A dialog box will
1990 appear asking for {\sl Annotation Name} and {\sl Annotation Description}.
1991 Enter "Iron binding site" and click {\sl OK}. A new, empty, row appears.
1992 }
1993 \exstep{
1994 Navigate to column 97. Move down and on the new annotation row called
1995 "Iron binding site", select column 97.
1996 Right click at this selection and select {\sl Label} from the context menu.
1997 Enter "Fe" in the box and click {\sl OK}. Right-click on the selection again
1998 and select {\sl Colour}.
1999 Choose a colour from the colour chooser dialog 
2000 and click {\sl OK}. Press [ESC] to remove the selection.
2001
2002 {\sl Note: depending on your Annotation sort settings, your newly
2003 created annotation row might "jump" to the top or bottom of the annotation
2004 panel. Just scroll up or down to find it again - the column you marked will
2005 still be selected. }
2006
2007 }
2008 \exstep{ Select columns 70-77 on the annotation row. Right-click and choose {\sl Sheet} from the
2009  context menu. You will be prompted for a label. Enter "B" and press {\sl OK}. A new line showing the 
2010  sheet as an arrow appears. The colour of the label can be changed but not the colour of the sheet 
2011  arrow. 
2012 }
2013 \exstep{Right click on the title text in the annotation row that you just
2014 created.
2015 Select {\sl Export Annotation} in context menu and, in the Export Annotation
2016 dialog box that will open, select the Jalview format and click the {\sl [To Textbox]} button. 
2017 (The format for this file is given in the Jalview help. Press [F1] to open it ([F1]-[Fn] (Mac)),
2018 and find the "Annotations File Format" entry in the "Alignment Annotations" section of the contents 
2019 pane.) }
2020
2021 \exstep{Open a text editor and copy the annotation text into the editor.
2022 Edit the text by changing the name of the annotation row and save the file.}
2023 \exstep{Drag the file onto the alignment in Jalview and check the annotation
2024 panel.} \exstep{Return to the text editor, add an additional helix somewhere
2025 along the row, save the file and re-importing it into Jalview as previously.
2026 {\sl Hint: Use the Export Annotation function to view what helix annotation looks like in 
2027 a Jalview annotation file.}}
2028 \exstep{In the alignment window menu, select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Annotations...} 
2029 to export all the alignment's annotation to a file. Save the file.}
2030 \exstep{Open the exported annotation in a text editor, and use the Annotation File Format 
2031 documentation to modify the style of the Conservation, Consensus and Quality annotation rows so 
2032 they appear as several lines on a single line graph.
2033 {\sl Hint: You need to change the style of annotation row in the first field of the annotation 
2034 row entry in the file. Create an annotation row grouping to overlay the
2035 three quantitative annotation rows.}
2036 }
2037 \exstep{{\bf Homework once you have completed exercise
2038 \ref{secstrpredex}:}
2039 \label{viewannotfileex}
2040       
2041 Recover or recreate the secondary structure predictions that you made from
2042 JPred. Use the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Export Annotation} function to view the Jnet secondary structure prediction annotation row.
2043 Note: the 
2044 SEQUENCE\_REF statements surrounding the row specifying the sequence association for the 
2045 annotation. 
2046 }
2047 \bf See the video at:
2048 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2049
2050
2051 \section{Sequence Features}
2052 Sequence features are annotation associated with a specific sequence - often marking a specific region, such as a domain or binding site. Jalview allows features to be created simply by selecting the area in a sequence (or sequences) to form the feature and selecting {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Create Sequence Feature } from the right-click context menu (Figure \ref{features}). A dialog box allows the user to customise the feature with respect to name, group, and colour. The feature is then associated with the sequence. Moving the mouse over a residue associated with a feature brings up a tool tip listing all features associated with the residue.
2053
2054 \begin{figure}[htbp]
2055 \begin{center}
2056 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/feature1.pdf}
2057 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/feature2.pdf}
2058 \includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/feature3.pdf}
2059 \caption{{\bf Creating sequence features.} Features can readily be created from selections via the context menu and are then displayed on the sequence. }
2060 \label{features}
2061 \end{center}
2062 \end{figure}
2063
2064 Creation of features from a selection spanning multiple sequences results in the creation of one feature per sequence. 
2065 Each feature remains associated with its own sequence.
2066
2067 %%TODO: change EMBL to ENA in Jalview and the Manual !
2068
2069 \section{Importing Features from Databases}
2070 \label{featuresfromdb}
2071 Jalview supports feature retrieval from public databases.
2072 It includes built in parsers for Uniprot, Ensembl and ENA (or EMBL) records retrieved
2073 from the EBI. Sequences retrieved from these sources using the sequence fetcher (see
2074 Section \ref{fetchseq}) will already possess features.
2075
2076
2077 \begin{figure}[htbp]
2078 \begin{center}
2079 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/features4.pdf}
2080 \caption{{\bf Multiple sequence features.} An alignment with JPred secondary structure prediction annotation below it, and many sequence features overlaid onto the aligned sequences. The tooltip lists the features annotating the residue below the mouse-pointer.}
2081 \end{center}
2082 \end{figure}
2083
2084
2085 \subsection{Sequence Database Reference Retrieval}
2086 \label{fetchdbrefs}
2087 Jalview maintains a list of external database references for each sequence in
2088 an alignment. These are listed in a tooltip when the mouse is moved over the
2089 sequence ID when the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Sequence ID Tooltip $\Rightarrow$
2090 Show Database Refs } option is enabled. Sequences retrieved using the sequence
2091 fetcher will always have at least one database reference, but alignments
2092 imported from an alignment file generally have no database references.
2093
2094 \subsubsection{Database References and Sequence Coordinate Systems}
2095
2096 Jalview displays features in the local sequence's coordinate system which is
2097 given by its `start' and `end'. Any sequence features on the sequence will be
2098 rendered relative to the sequence's start position. If the start/end positions
2099 do not match the coordinate system from which the features were defined, then
2100 the features will be displayed incorrectly.
2101
2102 \subsubsection{Viewing and Exporting a Sequence's Database Annotation}
2103
2104 You can export all the database cross references and annotation terms shown in
2105 the sequence ID tooltip for a sequence by right-clicking and selecting the {\sl
2106 [Sequence ID] $\Rightarrow$ Sequence Details} option from the popup
2107 menu.
2108 A similar option is provided in the {\sl Selection} sub-menu allowing you to
2109 obtain annotation for the sequences currently selected. 
2110
2111 \parbox[l]{3.4in}{
2112 The {\sl Sequence Details
2113 \ldots} option will open a window containing the same text as would be shown in
2114 the tooltip window, including any web links associated with the sequence. The
2115 text is HTML, and options on the window allow the raw code to be copied and
2116 pasted into a web page.}
2117 \parbox[c]{3in}{
2118 \centerline{\includegraphics[width=2.2in]{images/seqdetailsreport.pdf}}}
2119
2120 \subsubsection{Automatically Discovering a Sequence's Database References}
2121 Jalview includes a function to automatically verify and update each sequence's
2122 start and end numbering against any of the sequence databases that the {\sl
2123 Sequence Fetcher} has access to. This function is accessed from the {\sl
2124 Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Fetch DB References} sub-menu in the Alignment
2125 window. This menu allows you to query either the set of {\sl Standard
2126 Databases}, which includes EMBL, Ensembl, Uniprot, the PDB, or just a specific datasource from one of the submenus.
2127 When one of the entries from this menu is selected, Jalview will use the ID
2128 string from each sequence in the alignment or in the currently selected set to
2129 retrieve records from the external source. Any sequences that are retrieved are
2130 matched against the local sequence, and if the local sequence is found to be a
2131 sub-sequence of the retrieved sequence then the local sequence's start/end
2132 numbering is updated.  A new database reference mapping is created, mapping the
2133 local sequence to the external database, and the local sequence inherits any
2134 additional annotation retrieved from the database sequence.
2135
2136 The database retrieval process terminates when a valid mapping is found for a
2137 sequence, or if all database queries failed to retrieve a matching sequence.
2138 Termination is indicated by the disappearance of the moving progress indicator
2139 on the alignment window. A dialog box may be shown once it completes which
2140 lists sequences for which records were found, but the sequence retrieved from
2141 the database did not exactly contain the sequence given in the alignment (the
2142 {\sl ``Sequence not 100\% match'' dialog box}).
2143
2144
2145 \subsubsection{Rate of Feature Retrieval}
2146 Feature retrieval can take some time if a large number of sources are selected
2147 and if the alignment contains a large number of sequences.  
2148 As features are retrieved, they are immediately added to the current alignment view.
2149 The retrieved features are shown on the sequence and can be customised as described previously.
2150
2151
2152 \subsection{Customising Feature Display}
2153
2154 \begin{figure}[htbp]
2155 \begin{center}
2156 \includegraphics[width=5in]{images/features5.pdf}
2157 \caption{{\bf Customising sequence features.} Features can be recoloured, switched on or off and have the rendering order changed. }
2158 \label{custfeat}
2159 \end{center}
2160 \end{figure}
2161
2162 Feature display can be toggled on or off by selecting the {\sl View
2163 $\Rightarrow$ Show Sequence Features} menu option. When multiple features are
2164 present it is usually necessary to customise the display. Jalview allows the
2165 display, colour, rendering order and transparency of features to be modified
2166 {\sl via} the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Feature Settings\ldots} menu option. This
2167 brings up a dialog window (Figure \ref{custfeat}) which allows the
2168 visibility of individual feature types to be selected, assigned colours to be changed (by
2169 clicking on the colour of each sequence feature type) and the rendering order
2170 modified by dragging feature types to a new position in the list. Dragging the
2171 slider alters the transparency of the feature rendering. Clicking in the {\sl Configuration} column
2172  opens the {\sl Display Settings} dialog which allows more complex shading schemes 
2173  and also the creation of filters, and right-clicking opens a context sensitive menu
2174   that offers options for selecting and hiding columns or sorting the alignment according the feature's distribution or score attribute.
2175 These capabilities are described further in sections
2176 \ref{featureschemes} and \ref{featureordering}.
2177
2178
2179 \subsection{Changing how Features are coloured and displayed}
2180 \label{featureschemes}
2181 Sometimes, you may need to visualize the differences in information carried by
2182 sequence features of the same type. This is most often the case when features
2183 of a particular type are the result of a specific type of database query or calculation.
2184 Here, they may also carry information within their textual description, or most commonly
2185 for calculations, a score related to the property being investigated. Features imported
2186 from genomic databases and Variant Call Format files may also have a number of additional
2187 attributes. Jalview allow filters and different types of colouring to be applied to allow variations in these attributes to be highlighted.
2188 In order to create a filter or modify the way a feature type is coloured, select the `Configuration' column for that {\sl Feature Type} in the {\sl Sequence Feature Settings} dialog box. 
2189
2190 Instead of shading a feature with an assigned colour according to its type, you can select the `Colour by text'
2191 option to create feature colours according to the description text associated
2192 with each feature. This is useful for general feature types - such as
2193 Uniprot's `DOMAIN' feature - where the actual type of domain is given in the
2194 feature's description. If other attributes are present you can choose one of them from the drop-down menu.
2195
2196 If Scores or numeric attributes are present, the {\sl Graduated Colour} section of the dialog allows a quantitative
2197 shading scheme to be defined, with the highest
2198 scores receiving the `Max' colour, and the lowest scoring features coloured
2199 with the `Min' colour. Alternately, 
2200 you can define a threshold to exclude low or
2201 high-scoring features from the alignment display. This is done by choosing your
2202 desired threshold type (either above or below), using the drop-down menu in the
2203 dialog box. Then, adjust the slider or enter a value in the text box to set the
2204 threshold for displaying this type of feature.
2205
2206 When a filters and complex colourschemes are applied, the configuration column will show coloured blocks or text to indicate the colouring
2207 style and any attribute filters. 
2208
2209
2210 \subsection{Using Features to Re-order the Alignment}
2211 \label{featureordering}
2212 The presence of sequence features on certain sequences or in a particular
2213 region of an alignment can quantitatively identify important trends in
2214 the aligned sequences. In this case, it is more useful to
2215 re-order the alignment based on the number of features or their associated scores, rather than simply re-colour the aligned sequences. 
2216 The sequence feature settings
2217 dialog box provides two buttons: `Sequence sort by Density' and `Sequence sort by
2218 Score', that allow you to reorder the alignment according to the number of
2219 sequence features present on each sequence, and also according to any scores
2220 associated with a feature. Each of these buttons uses the currently displayed
2221 features to determine the ordering, but
2222 if you wish to re-order the alignment using a single type of feature, then you can do this from the {\sl Feature Type}'s
2223 popup menu. Simply right-click the type's style in the Sequence Feature Settings dialog
2224 box, and select one of the {\sl Sort by Score} and {\sl Sort by Density}
2225 options to re-order the alignment. Finally, if a specific region is selected,
2226 then only features found in that region of the alignment will be used to
2227 create the new alignment ordering.
2228 % \exercise{Shading and Sorting Alignments using Sequence Features}{
2229 % \label{shadingorderingfeatsex}
2230
2231 % This exercise is currently not included in the tutorial because no DAS servers
2232 % currently exist that yield per-residue features for any Uniprot sequence. 
2233
2234 % \exstep{Re-load the alignment from \ref{dasfeatretrexcercise}.
2235 % }
2236 % \exstep{Open the
2237 % feature settings panel, and, after first clearing the current
2238 % selection, press the {\em Seq Sort by Density} button a few times.}
2239 % \exstep{Use the DAS fetcher to retrieve the Kyte and Doolittle Hydrophobicity
2240 % scores for the protein sequences in the alignment.
2241 % {\sl Hint: the nickname for the das source is `KD$\_$hydrophobicity'.}}
2242 % \exstep{Change the feature settings so only the hydrophobicity features are
2243 % displayed. Mouse over the annotation and also export and examine the GFF and
2244 % Jalview features file to better understand how the hydrophobicity measurements
2245 % are recorded.}
2246 % \exstep{Apply a {\sl Graduated Colour} to the hydrophobicity annotation to
2247 % reveal the variation in average hydrophobicity across the alignment.}
2248 % \exstep{Select a range of alignment columns, and use one of the sort by feature buttons to order the alignment according to that region's average
2249 % hydrophobicity.}
2250 % \exstep{Save the alignment as a project, for use in exercise
2251 % \ref{threshgradfeaturesex}.} }
2252
2253 % \exercise{Shading alignments with combinations of graduated feature
2254 % colourschemes}{
2255 % \label{threshgradfeaturesex}
2256 % \exstep{Reusing the annotated alignment from exercise
2257 % \ref{shadingorderingfeatsex}, experiment with the colourscheme threshold to
2258 % highlight the most, or least hydrophobic regions. Note how the {\sl Colour} icon for the {\sl Feature Type} changes when you change the threshold type and press OK.}
2259 % \exstep{Change the colourscheme so
2260 % that features at the threshold are always coloured grey, and the most
2261 % hydrophobic residues are coloured red, regardless of the threshold value
2262 % ({\em hint - there is a switch on the dialog to do this for you}).}
2263 % \exstep{Enable the Uniprot {\em chain} annotation in the feature settings
2264 % display and re-order the features so it is visible under the hydrophobicity
2265 % annotation.}
2266 % \exstep{Apply a {\sl Graduated Colour} to the {\em chain}
2267 % annotation so that it distinguishes the different canonical names associated
2268 % with the mature polypeptide chains.}
2269 % \exstep{Export the alignment's sequence features using the Jalview and GFF file formats, to see how the different types of graduated feature
2270 % colour styles are encoded. }
2271 % }
2272
2273
2274 \subsection{Sequence Feature File Formats}
2275
2276 Jalview supports the widely used GFF tab delimited format\footnote{see
2277 http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/software/gff/spec.html} and its own Jalview
2278 Features file format for the import of sequence annotation. Features and
2279 alignment annotation are also extracted from other formats such as Stockholm,
2280 and AMSA. URL links may also be attached to features. See the online
2281 documentation for more details of the additional capabilities of the Jalview
2282 features file.
2283
2284 \exercise{Creating Features}{
2285 \label{featuresex}
2286 \exstep{Open the alignment at \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}. 
2287 We know that the Cysteine residues at columns 97, 102, 105 and 135 are involved in 
2288 iron binding so we will create them as features. Navigate to column 97, sequence 1. 
2289 Select the entire column by clicking in the ruler bar. Then right-click on the selection 
2290 to bring up the context menu and select {\sl Selection $\Rightarrow$ Create Sequence Feature}. 
2291 A dialog box will appear.
2292 }
2293 \exstep{
2294 Enter a suitable Sequence Feature Name  (e.g. ``Iron binding site") in the
2295 appropriate box. Click on the Feature Colour bar to change the colour if
2296 desired, add a short description (``One of four Iron binding Cysteines") and
2297 press {\sl OK}. The features will then appear on the sequences. } \exstep{Roll
2298 the mouse cursor over the new features.
2299 Note that the position given in the tool tip is the residue number, not the column number. 
2300 To demonstrate that there is one feature per sequence, clear all selections by pressing [ESC],
2301  then insert a gap in sequence 3 at column 95 using the [SHIFT] key.
2302 Roll the mouse over the features and you will see that the feature has moved
2303 with the sequence. Delete the gap you created using {\sl Edit
2304 $\Rightarrow$ Undo}.
2305 }
2306 \exstep{
2307 Add a similar feature to column 102. When the feature dialog box appears, clicking the Sequence Feature 
2308 Name box brings up a list of previously described features. Using the same Sequence Feature Name allows the features to be grouped.}
2309 \exstep{Select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Feature Settings\ldots} from the
2310 alignment window menu. The Sequence Feature Settings window will appear. Move
2311 this so that you can see the features you have just created. Click the check
2312 box for ``Iron binding site"  under {\sl Display} and note that display of this
2313 feature type is now turned off. Click it again and note that the features are
2314 now displayed. Close the sequence feature settings box by clicking {\sl OK} or
2315 {\sl Cancel}.} 
2316
2317 \exstep{Select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Show Sequence Features} from the
2318 alignment window menu. The sequence features are now hidden. Repeat this step and the features are
2319 displayed.}
2320
2321 \bf See the video at:
2322 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2323
2324 \chapter{Multiple Sequence Alignment}
2325 \label{msaservices}
2326 Sequences can be aligned using a range of algorithms provided by JABA web
2327 services, including ClustalW\footnote{{\sl ``CLUSTAL W:
2328 improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence
2329 weighting, position specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice."} Thompson
2330 JD, Higgins DG, Gibson TJ (1994) {\sl  Nucleic Acids Research} {\bf 22},
2331 4673-80}, Muscle\footnote{{\sl ``MUSCLE: a multiple sequence alignment method
2332 with reduced time and space complexity"} Edgar, R.C.
2333 (2004) {\sl BMC Bioinformatics} {\bf 5}, 113},  MAFFT\footnote{{\sl ``MAFFT: a
2334 novel method for rapid multiple sequence alignment based on fast Fourier
2335 transform"}  Katoh, K., Misawa, K., Kuma, K. and Miyata, T. (2002) {\sl Nucleic
2336 Acids Research} {\bf 30}, 3059-3066.  and {\sl ``MAFFT version 5:
2337 improvement in accuracy of multiple sequence alignment"} Katoh, K., Kuma, K.,
2338 Toh, H. and Miyata, T. (2005) {\sl Nucleic Acids Research} {\bf 33}, 511-518.},
2339 ProbCons,\footnote{PROBCONS: Probabilistic Consistency-based Multiple Sequence
2340 Alignment.
2341 Do, C.B., Mahabhashyam, M.S.P., Brudno, M., and Batzoglou, S.
2342 (2005) {\sl Genome Research} {\bf 15} 330-340.} T-COFFEE\footnote{T-Coffee:
2343 A novel method for multiple sequence alignments. (2000) Notredame, Higgins and
2344 Heringa {\sl JMB} {\bf 302} 205-217} and Clustal Omega.\footnote{Fast, scalable
2345 generation of high-quality protein multiple sequence alignments using Clustal
2346 Omega. Sievers F, Wilm A, Dineen DG, Gibson TJ, Karplus K, Li W, Lopez R,
2347 McWilliam H, Remmert M, Soding J, Thompson JD, Higgins DG (2011) {\sl Molecular
2348 Systems Biology} {\bf 7} 539
2349 \href{http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/msb.2011.75}{doi:10.1038/msb.2011.75}} Of these,
2350 T-COFFEE is slow but accurate. ClustalW is historically
2351 the most widely used. Muscle is fast and probably best for
2352 smaller alignments. MAFFT is probably the best for large alignments,
2353 however Clustal Omega, released in 2011, is arguably the fastest and most
2354 accurate tool for protein multiple alignment.
2355
2356 \section{Performing a multiple sequence alignment}
2357 To run an alignment web service, select the appropriate method from the {\sl
2358 Web Service $\Rightarrow$  Alignment $\Rightarrow$ \ldots} submenu (Figure
2359 \ref{webservices}). For each service you may either perform an alignment with
2360 default settings, use one of the available presets, or customise the parameters
2361 with the `{\sl Edit and Run ..}' dialog box. Once the job is submitted, a
2362 progress window will appear giving information about the job and any errors that
2363 occur. After successful completion of the job, a new alignment window is opened
2364 with the results, in this case an alignment. By default, the new alignment will be
2365 ordered in the same way as the input sequences. Note: many alignment
2366 programs re-order the input during their analysis and place homologous
2367 sequences close together, the MSA algorithm ordering can be recovered
2368 using the `Algorithm ordering' entry within the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$
2369 Sort } sub menu.
2370
2371 \subsection{Realignment to add sequences to an existing alignment}
2372 The re-alignment option is currently only supported by Clustal  
2373 Omega and ClustalW. When performing a re-alignment, Jalview submits the
2374 current selection to the alignment service complete with any existing gaps.
2375 Realignment with ClustalW is useful when one wishes to align
2376 additional sequences to an existing alignment without any further optimisation
2377 to the existing alignment. ClustalO's realignment works by generating a
2378 probabilistic model (a.k.a HMM) from the original alignment, and then realigns
2379 {\bf all} sequences to this profile. For a well aligned MSA, this process
2380 will simply reconstruct the original alignment (with additional sequences), but
2381 in the case of low quality MSAs, some differences may be introduced.
2382
2383 \begin{figure}[htbp]
2384 \begin{center}
2385 \parbox[c]{1.5in}{\includegraphics[width=1.5in]{images/ws1.pdf}}
2386 \parbox[c]{2.5in}{\includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/ws2.pdf}}
2387 \parbox[c]{2in}{\includegraphics[width=2in]{images/ws3.pdf}}
2388 \caption{{\bf Multiple alignment via web services} The appropriate method is
2389 selected from the menu (left), a status box appears (centre), and the results
2390 appear in a new window (right).}
2391 \label{webservices}
2392 \end{center}
2393 \end{figure}
2394
2395 \subsection{Alignments of Sequences that include Hidden Regions}
2396 If the view or selected region submitted for alignment contains hidden
2397 regions, then {\bf only the visible sequences will be submitted to the service}.
2398 Furthermore, each contiguous segment of sequences will be aligned independently
2399 (resulting in a number of alignment `subjobs' appearing in the status window).
2400 Finally, the results of each subjob will be concatenated with the hidden regions
2401 in the input data prior to their display in a new window. This approach ensures
2402 that 1) hidden column boundaries in the input data are preserved in the
2403 resulting alignment - in a similar fashion to the constraint that hidden columns
2404 place on alignment editing (see Section \ref{lockededits} and 2) hidden
2405 columns can be used to preserve existing parts of an alignment whilst the
2406 visible parts are locally refined.
2407
2408 \subsection{Alignment Service Limits}
2409 Multiple alignment is a computationally intensive calculation. Some JABA server
2410 services and service presets only allow a certain number of sequences to be
2411 aligned. The precise number will depend on the server that you are using to
2412 perform the alignment. Should you try to submit more sequences than a service
2413 can handle, then an error message will be shown informing you of the maximum
2414 number allowed by the server.
2415
2416 \exercise{Multiple Sequence Alignment}{
2417 \label{msaex}
2418 \exstep{ Close all windows. Open the alignment at {\sf
2419 http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/unaligned.fa}.  Select {\sl
2420 Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Alignment $\Rightarrow$ Muscle with Defaults}. 
2421 A window will open giving the job status. After a short time, a second window will open
2422  with the results of the alignment.} 
2423  \exstep{Return to the first sequence alignment window by clicking on 
2424  the window, and repeat using {\sl ClustalO} (Omega) ({\sl with Defaults}), from the
2425  {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Alignment} menu, using the same initial
2426  alignment.
2427  Compare them and you should notice small differences. }
2428 \exstep{Select the last three sequences in the MAFFT alignment (you may need the scroll down the alignment), and de-align them 
2429 with {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Remove All Gaps}. Press [ESC] to deselect these
2430 sequences. Then submit this view for re-alignment with {\sl ClustalO}.}
2431 \exstep{Return to the alignment window in section (c), use [CTRL]-Z (undo) to
2432 recover the alignment of the last three sequences in this MAFFT alignment.
2433 Once the ClustalO re-alignment has completed, compare the results of
2434 re-alignment of the three sequences with their alignment in the original MAFFT result.}
2435 \exstep{Select columns 60 to 125 in the original MAFFT alignment and hide them,
2436 by right clicking the mouse to bring up context menu.
2437 Select {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Alignment $\Rightarrow$ Mafft with Defaults} to 
2438 submit the visible portion of the alignment to MAFFT. When the web service job pane appears, 
2439 note that there are now two alignment job status panes shown in the window.}
2440 \exstep{When the MAFFT job has finished, compare the alignment of the N-terminal visible 
2441 region in the result with the corresponding region of the original alignment.}
2442 \exstep {If you wish, 
2443 select and hide a few more columns in the N-terminal region, and submit the alignment to the 
2444 service again and explore the effect of local alignment on the non-homologous parts of the 
2445 N-terminal region.}
2446 {\bf See the video at:
2447 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2448 }
2449
2450 \section{Customising the Parameters used for Alignment}
2451
2452 JABA web services allow you to vary the parameters used when performing a
2453 bioinformatics analysis. For JABA alignment services, this means you are
2454 usually able to modify the following types of parameters:
2455 \begin{list}{$\bullet$}{}
2456 \item{Amino acid or nucleotide substitution score matrix}
2457 \item{Gap opening and widening penalties}
2458 \item{Types of distance metric used to construct guide trees}
2459 \item{Number of rounds of re-alignment or alignment optimisation}  
2460 \end{list}
2461 \begin{figure}[htbc]
2462 \center{
2463 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/jvaliwsparamsbox.pdf}
2464 \caption{{\bf An alignment service's parameter editing dialog box}.}
2465 \label{jwsparamsdialog} }
2466 \end{figure}
2467
2468 \subsection{Getting Help on the Parameters for a Service}
2469
2470 Each parameter available for a method usually has a short description, which
2471 Jalview will display as a tooltip, or as a text pane that can be opened under
2472 the parameter's controls. In the parameter shown in Figure
2473 \ref{clustalwparamdetail}, the description was opened by selecting the button on the left hand side.
2474
2475 \begin{figure}[htbp]
2476 \begin{center}
2477 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/clustalwparamdetail.pdf}
2478 \caption{{\bf ClustalW parameter slider detail}. From the ClustalW {\sl Clustal $\Rightarrow$ Edit settings and run ...} dialog box. }
2479 \label{clustalwparamdetail}
2480 \end{center}
2481 \end{figure} 
2482
2483 \subsection{Alignment Presets}
2484 The different multiple alignment algorithms available from JABA vary greatly in
2485 the number of adjustable parameters, and it is often difficult to identify what
2486 are the best values for the sequences that you are trying to align. For these
2487 reasons, each JABA service may provide one or more presets -- which are
2488 pre-defined sets of parameters suited for particular types of alignment
2489 problem. For instance, the Muscle service provides the following presets:
2490 \begin{list}{$\bullet$}{}
2491 \item Large alignments (balanced)
2492 \item Protein alignments (fastest speed)
2493 \item Nucleotide alignments (fastest speed)
2494 \end{list}
2495
2496 The presets are displayed in the JABA web services submenu, and can also be
2497 accessed from the parameter editing dialog box, which is opened by selecting
2498 the `{\sl Edit settings and run ...}' option from the web services menu. If you have used
2499 a preset, then it will be mentioned at the beginning of the job status file shown
2500 in the web service job progress window.
2501
2502 \subsection{User Defined Presets}
2503 Jalview allows you to create your own presets for a particular service. To do
2504 this, select the `{\sl Edit settings and run ...}' option for your service,
2505 which will open a parameter editing dialog box like the one shown in Figure
2506 \ref{jwsparamsdialog}.
2507
2508 The top row of this dialog allows you to browse the existing presets, and
2509 when editing a parameter set, allows you to change its nickname. As you
2510 adjust settings, buttons will appear at the top of the parameters dialog that
2511 allow you to Revert or Update the currently selected user preset with your changes, Delete the current preset, or Create a new preset, if none exists with the given name. In addition to the parameter set name, you can also provide a short
2512 description for the parameter set, which will be shown in the tooltip for the
2513 parameter set's entry in the web services menu.
2514
2515 \subsubsection{Saving Parameter Sets}
2516 When creating a custom parameter set, you will be asked for a file name to save
2517 it. The location of the file is recorded in the Jalview user preferences in the
2518 same way as a custom alignment colourscheme, so when Jalview is launched again,
2519 it will show your custom preset amongst the options available for running the
2520 JABA service.
2521
2522 %% TODO - reinstate this exercise about reinstating presets
2523
2524 % \exercise{Creating and using user defined presets}{\label{createandusepreseex}
2525 % \exstep{Import the file at
2526 % \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/fdx\_unaligned.fa} into jalview.}
2527 % \exstep{Use the `{\slDiscover Database Ids}' function to recover the PDB cross
2528 % references for the sequences.}
2529 % \exstep{Align the sequences using the default ClustalW parameters.}
2530 % \exstep{Use the `{\sl Edit and run..}'
2531 % option to open the ClustalW parameters dialog box, and create a new preset using
2532 % the following settings:
2533 % \begin{list}{$\bullet$}{}
2534 % \item BLOSUM matrix (unchanged)
2535 % \item Gap Opening and End Gap penalties = 0.05
2536 % \item Gap Extension and Separation penalties = 0.05
2537 % \end{list}
2538
2539 % As you edit the parameters, buttons will appear on the dialog box
2540 % allowing you revert your changes or save your settings as a new parameter
2541 % set.
2542
2543 % Before you save your settings, remeber to give them a meaningful name by editing
2544 % the text box at the top of the dialog box.
2545 % }
2546 % \exstep{Repeat the alignment using your new parameter set by selecting it from
2547 % the {\sl ClustalW Presets menu}.} 
2548 % \exstep{These sequences have PDB structures associated with them, so it is
2549 % possible to compare the quality of the alignments.
2550
2551 % Use the {\sl View all {\bf N}
2552 % structures} option to calculate the superposition of 1fdn on 1fxd for both
2553 % alignments (refer to section \ref{superposestructs} for instructions). Which
2554 % alignment gives the best RMSD ? }
2555 % \exstep{Apply the same alignment parameter settings to the example alignment
2556 % (available from \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/examples/uniref50.fa}). 
2557
2558 % Are there differences ? If not, why not ?
2559 % }
2560 % }
2561
2562 \section{Protein Alignment Conservation Analysis}
2563 \label{aacons}
2564 The {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Conservation} menu controls the computation
2565 of over 17 different amino acid conservation measures for the current alignment
2566 view. The JABAWS AACon Alignment Conservation Calculation Service, which is used
2567 to calculate these scores, provides a variety of standard measures described by
2568 Valdar in 2002\footnote{Scoring residue conservation. Valdar (2002) {\sl
2569 Proteins: Structure, Function, and Genetics} {\bf 43} 227-241.} as well as an efficient implementation of the SMERFs
2570 score developed by Manning et al. in 2008.\footnote{SMERFS Score Manning et al. {\sl BMC
2571 Bioinformatics} 2008, {\bf 9} 51 \href{http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-9-51}{doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-51}}
2572
2573 \subsection{Enabling and Disabling AACon Calculations}
2574 When the AACon Calculation entry in the {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$
2575 Conservation} menu is ticked, AACon calculations will be performed every time
2576 the alignment is modified. Selecting the menu item will enable or disable
2577 automatic recalculation.
2578
2579 \subsection{Configuring which AACon Calculations are Performed}
2580 The {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Conservation $\Rightarrow$ Change AACon
2581 Settings ...} menu entry will open a web services parameter dialog for the
2582 currently configured AACon server. Standard presets are provided for quick and
2583 more expensive conservation calculations, and parameters are also provided to
2584 change the way that SMERFS calculations are performed.
2585 AACon settings for an alignment are saved in Jalview projects along with the
2586 latest calculation results.
2587
2588 \subsection{Changing the Server used for AACon Calculations}
2589 If you are working with alignments too large to analyse with the public JABAWS
2590 server, then you will most likely have already configured additional JABAWS
2591 servers. By default, Jalview will chose the first AACon service available from
2592 the list of JABAWS servers available. You can change the AACon services by 
2593 selecting it from the {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$
2594 Conservation $\Rightarrow$ Change AACon Settings} submenu.
2595 Alternatively to add new service, go to the desktop window menu and select {\sl Tools $\Rightarrow$
2596 Preferences $\Rightarrow$ Web Services tab} and add {\sl New Services URL}, then use the {\sl move up} or {\sl move down} buttons 
2597 to reorder the services.
2598
2599
2600 \chapter{Analysis of Alignments}
2601 \label{alignanalysis}
2602 Jalview provides support for sequence analysis in two ways. A number of
2603 analytical methods are `built-in', these are accessed from the {\sl Calculate}
2604 alignment window menu. Computationally intensive analyses are run outside
2605 Jalview {\sl via} web services - and found under the
2606 {\sl Web Service} menu. In this section, we describe the built-in analysis
2607 capabilities common to both the Jalview Desktop and the JalviewJS.
2608  
2609 \section{PCA}
2610 Principal components analysis calculations create a spatial
2611 representation of the similarities within the current selection or the whole alignment if no selection has been made. After
2612 the calculation finishes, a 3D viewer displays each sequence as a point in
2613 3D `similarity space'. Sets of similar sequences tend to lie near each other in
2614 this space.
2615 Note: The calculation is computationally expensive, and may fail for very large
2616 sets of sequences - because the JVM has run out of memory. Memory issues, and
2617 how to overcome them, were discussed in Section \ref{memorylimits}.
2618
2619 \subsubsection{What is PCA?}
2620 Principal components analysis is a technique for examining the structure of
2621 complex data sets. The components are a set of dimensions formed from the
2622 measured values in the data set, and the principal component is the one with the
2623 greatest magnitude, or length. The sets of measurements that differ the most
2624 should lie at either end of this principal axis, and the other axes correspond
2625 to less extreme patterns of variation in the data set.
2626 In this case, the components are generated by an eigenvector decomposition of
2627 the matrix formed from the sum of pairwise substitution scores at each aligned
2628 position between each pair of sequences. The basic method is described in the
2629 1995 paper by {\sl G. Casari, C. Sander} and {\sl A. Valencia} \footnote{{\sl
2630 Nature Structural Biology} (1995) {\bf 2}, 171-8.
2631 PMID: 7749921} and implemented at the SeqSpace server at the EBI.\footnote{See \url{http://www.jalview.org/help/html/calculations/pca.html}.}
2632
2633 % Jalview provides two different options for the PCA calculation: SeqSpace and
2634 % Jalview mode. In SeqSpace mode, PCAs are computed using the identity matrix, and
2635 % gaps are treated as 'the unknown residue' (this actually differs from the
2636 % original SeqSpace paper, and will be adjusted in a future version of Jalview).
2637 % In Jalview mode, PCAs are computed using the chosen score matrix - which for
2638 % protein sequences, defaults to BLOSUM 62, and for nucleotides, is the
2639 % DNA identity matrix that also treats Us and Ts as identical, to support analysis
2640 % of both RNA and DNA alignments.
2641
2642 \subsubsection{The PCA Viewer}
2643
2644 PCA analysis can be launched from the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA} menu option. 
2645 {\bf PCA requires a selection containing at
2646 least 4 sequences}.  In the Choose Calculation window, select the {\sl Principal Components Analysis} button and then select {\sl Calculate} 
2647 (Figure \ref{PCA}).
2648 Each sequence is represented by a small square, coloured by the background
2649 colour of the sequence ID label. The axes can be rotated by clicking and
2650 dragging the left mouse button and zoomed using the $\uparrow$ and $\downarrow$
2651 keys or the scroll wheel of the mouse (if available).  A tool tip appears if the
2652 cursor is placed over a sequence. Sequences can be selected by clicking on them.
2653 [CTRL]-Click can be used to select multiple sequences.
2654
2655 Labels will be shown for each sequence by toggling the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$
2656 Show labels} menu option, and the plot background colour changed {\sl via} the
2657 {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Background Colour..} dialog box. A graphical
2658 representation of the PCA plot can be exported as an EPS or PNG image {\sl via}
2659 the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save as $\Rightarrow$ \ldots } submenu.
2660
2661 \exercise{Principal Component Analysis}
2662 {\label{pcaex}
2663 \exstep{Load the alignment at
2664 \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}.}
2665 \exstep{Select the menu option {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA..}.  in the alignment
2666 window and a dialogue box will open. Select the Principal Component Analysis option
2667 and then click the Calculate button.} 
2668 \exstep{Move
2669 this window within the desktop so that the alignment and PCA viewer windows are visible.
2670 Try rotating the plot by clicking and dragging the mouse on the plot in the PCA window.
2671 Note that clicking on points in the plot will highlight the sequences on the
2672 alignment.}
2673 \exstep{Use the [ESC] key to deselect sequence selection.
2674 Select {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA..}. in the alignment window. In dialogue box select Neighbour
2675 Joining and in the drop-down list select BLOSUM62. Click the Calculate button
2676 and a tree window will open.}
2677 \exstep{Place the mouse cursor on the tree so that the
2678 tree partition divides the tree into a number of groups, each with a
2679 different (arbitrarily selected) colour.
2680 Note how the colour of the sequence ID label matches both the colour of
2681 the partitioned tree and the points in the PCA plot.} 
2682 {\bf See the video at:
2683 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2684 }
2685
2686 \begin{figure}[hbtp]
2687 \begin{center}
2688 \includegraphics[width=2in]{images/PCA1.pdf}
2689 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/PCA3.pdf}
2690 \caption{{\bf PCA Analysis.} }
2691 \label{PCA}
2692 \end{center}
2693 \end{figure}
2694
2695
2696
2697 \subsubsection{PCA Data Export}
2698 Although the PCA viewer supports export of the current view, the plots produced
2699 are rarely suitable for direct publication. The PCA viewer's {\sl File} menu
2700 includes a number of options for exporting the PCA matrix and transformed points
2701 as comma separated value (CSV) files. These files can be imported by tools such
2702 as {\bf R} or {\bf gnuplot} in order to graph the data.
2703
2704 \section{Trees}
2705 \label{trees}
2706
2707 Jalview can calculate and display trees, providing interactive tree-based
2708 grouping of sequences though a tree viewer. All trees are calculated {\sl via}
2709 the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA \ldots} menu option.
2710 Trees can be calculated from distance matrices determined from \% identity or
2711 aggregate BLOSUM 62 score using either {\sl Average Distance} (UPGMA) or {\sl
2712 Neighbour Joining} algorithms. The input data for a tree is either the selected
2713 region or the whole alignment, excluding any hidden regions.
2714
2715 On calculating a tree, a new window opens (Figure \ref{trees1}) which contains
2716 the tree. Various display settings can be found in the tree window {\sl View}
2717 menu, including font, scaling and label display options. The {\sl File
2718 $\Rightarrow$ Save As} submenu contains options for image and Newick file
2719 export. Newick format is a standard file format for trees which allows them to
2720 be exported to other programs.  Jalview can also read in external trees in
2721 Newick format {\sl via} the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Load Associated Tree} menu
2722 option. Leaf names on imported trees will be matched to the associated alignment
2723 - unmatched leaves will still be displayed, and can be highlighted using the
2724 {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Mark Unlinked Leaves} menu option.
2725
2726
2727
2728 \begin{figure}
2729 \begin{center}
2730 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/trees1.pdf}
2731 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/trees2.pdf}
2732 \includegraphics[width=1.25in]{images/trees4.pdf}
2733 \caption{{\bf Calculating Trees} Jalview provides a range of options 
2734 for calculating trees.
2735 Jalview can also load precalculated trees in Newick format (right).}
2736 \label{trees1}
2737 \end{center}
2738 \end{figure}
2739
2740 \begin{figure}
2741 \begin{center}
2742 \includegraphics[width=5in]{images/trees3.pdf}
2743 \caption{{\bf Interactive Trees} The tree level cutoff can be used to designate
2744 groups in Jalview.}
2745 \label{trees2}
2746 \end{center}
2747 \end{figure}
2748
2749 Clicking on the tree brings up a cursor across the height of the tree. The
2750 sequences are automatically partitioned and coloured (Figure \ref{trees2}). To
2751 group them together, select the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Sort $\Rightarrow$
2752 By Tree Order $\Rightarrow$ \ldots} alignment window menu option and choose the
2753 correct tree. The sequences will then be sorted according to the leaf order
2754 currently shown in the tree view. The coloured background to the sequence IDs
2755 can be removed with {\sl Select $\Rightarrow$ Undefine Groups} from the
2756 alignment window menu. Note that tree partitioning will also remove any groups
2757 and colourschemes on a view, so create a new view ([CTRL-T]) if you wish to
2758 preserve these.
2759
2760
2761 \exercise{Trees}
2762 {\label{treeex}
2763
2764 \exstep{Open the alignment at
2765 \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}.}
2766
2767 \exstep{Select {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA..}. in the alignment
2768 window menu and a dialogue box opens. In the tree section select Neighbour
2769 Joining, in the drop-down list select BLOSUM62 and click the Calculate
2770 button. A tree window will open.}
2771
2772 \exstep{Click on the
2773 tree window, a cursor will appear as a vertical line. Note that clicking will
2774 place this cursor, and divides the tree into a number of groups, each highlighted
2775 with a different colour. Place the cursor to give about 4 groups.}
2776
2777 \exstep{Place the mouse cursor on a node of the tree to open a tool tip. Double click the node to invert the leaves.
2778 }
2779
2780 \exstep{In the tree window, select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Sort Alignment
2781 by Tree}. The sequences are reordered to match the order in the tree and groups 
2782  are formed implicitly. Alternatively in the alignment window, select
2783 {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Sort $\Rightarrow$ By Tree Order $\Rightarrow$
2784  Neighbour Joining Tree using BLOSUM62 from...}.}
2785
2786 \exstep{Select {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA..}. in the alignment
2787 window. In the dialogue box, select Average Distance and in the drop down
2788 list select BLOSUM62. Click the Calculate button and a new
2789 tree window will appear. The group colouring makes it easy to see the differences between the two
2790 trees calculated by the different methods.}
2791
2792 \exstep{With no groups selected in the alignment window, select sequence 2 from
2793 column 60 to sequence 12 and column 123. Select {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$
2794 Tree or PCA..}. , in the dialogue box select Neighbour Joining and
2795 BLOSUM62, then click the Calculate button.
2796  A tree will appear containing 11 sequences. It has been coloured
2797  according to the already selected groups from the first tree and is calculated purely from the residues
2798  in the selection.}
2799
2800 Comparing the location of individual sequences between the three trees illustrates the importance of selecting appropriate regions of the 
2801 alignment for the calculation of trees.
2802
2803 {\bf See the video at:
2804 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2805
2806 }
2807
2808 %\subsubsection{Multiple Views and Input Data recovery from PCA and Tree Viewers}
2809 % move to ch. 3 ?
2810 %Both PCA and Tree viewers are linked analysis windows. This means that their selection and display are linked to a particular alignment, and control and reflect the selection state for a particular view.
2811
2812 \subsubsection{Recovering input data for a Tree or PCA Plot Calculation}
2813 \parbox[c]{5in}{
2814 The {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Data } option will open a new alignment window containing the original data used to calculate the tree or PCA plot (if available). This function is useful when a tree has been created and then the alignment subsequently changed. 
2815 }
2816 \parbox[c]{1.25in}{\centerline{\includegraphics[width=1.25in]{images/pca_fmenu.pdf}
2817 }}
2818
2819 \subsubsection{Changing the associated view for a Tree or PCA Viewer}
2820 \parbox[c]{4in}{
2821 The {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Associated Nodes With $\Rightarrow$ .. } submenu is shown when the viewer is associated with an alignment that is involved in multiple views. Selecting a different view does not affect the tree or PCA data, but will change the colouring and display of selected sequences in the display according to the colouring and selection state of the newly associated view. 
2822 } \parbox[c]{3in}{\centerline{
2823 \includegraphics[width=2.5in]{images/pca_vmenu.pdf} }}
2824
2825 \subsection{Tree Based Conservation Analysis}
2826 \label{treeconsanaly}
2827
2828 Trees reflect the pattern of global sequence similarity exhibited by the
2829 alignment, or region within the alignment, that was used for their calculation.
2830 The Jalview tree viewer enables sequences to be partitioned into groups based
2831 on the tree. This is done by clicking within the tree viewer window. Once subdivided, the
2832 conservation between and within groups can be visually compared in order to
2833 better understand the pattern of similarity revealed by the tree and the
2834 variation within the clades partitioned by the grouping. The conservation based
2835 colourschemes and the group associated conservation and consensus annotation
2836 (enabled using the alignment window's {\sl Annotations $\Rightarrow$ Autocalculated
2837 Annotation $\Rightarrow$ Group Conservation} and {\sl Group Consensus} options)
2838 can help when working with larger alignments.
2839
2840
2841
2842
2843 %\exercise{Pad Gaps in an Alignment}{
2844 %\exstep{Open the alignment at
2845 % \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}. In alignment window, ensure that the {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Pad Gaps } option is {\sl not} ticked, and insert one gap anywhere in the
2846 %alignment.}
2847 %\exstep{Select {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Calculate Tree $\Rightarrow$
2848 %Neighbour Joining Using BLOSUM62}.
2849
2850 %A warning dialog box {\bf ``Sequences not aligned'' } appears because the
2851 % sequences input to the tree calculation are of different lengths. }
2852
2853 %\exstep{Select {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ tick Pad Gaps } and perform the
2854 %tree calculation again. This time a new tree should appear - because padding
2855 %gaps ensures all the sequences are the same length after editing.}
2856 %{\sl Pad Gaps } option
2857 %can be set in Preferences using
2858 %{\sl Tool $\Rightarrow$ Preference $\Rightarrow$ Editing}.
2859
2860 %{\bf See the video at:
2861 %\url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2862 %}
2863
2864  \exercise{Tree Based Conservation Analysis}{
2865 \label{consanalyexerc}
2866 \exstep{Load the PF03460 PFAM seed alignment using the sequence fetcher. 
2867 Select {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ Taylor $\Rightarrow$ By Conservation}, set
2868  {\sl Conservation} shading threshold at around 20. }
2869  \exstep{Build a Neighbour joining tree by selecting {\sl Calculate
2870  $\Rightarrow$ Tree or PCA..}. in the alignment window. In the dialogue box, select Neighbour
2871 Joining and in the drop-down
2872 list select BLOSUM62, then click the Calculate button.}
2873 \exstep{Use the cursor to select a point on the tree to partition the
2874 alignment into groups.}
2875 \exstep {Select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Sort Alignment By Tree} option in the
2876 tree window to re-order the sequences in the alignment.
2877 Examine the variation in colouring between different groups of sequences in the
2878  alignment window. }
2879 \exstep {You may find it easier to browse the alignment if you first uncheck
2880  the {\sl Annotations $\Rightarrow$ Show Annotations} option. Open the
2881 Overview Window from the View menu to aid navigation.}
2882
2883 \exstep{Try changing the colourscheme of the residues in the alignment to
2884 BLOSUM62 (whilst ensuring that {\sl Apply Colour to All Groups} is selected).}
2885 {\sl Note: You may want to save the alignment and tree as a project file, since
2886 it is used in the next set of exercises. }
2887
2888 {\bf See the video at:
2889 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
2890 }
2891
2892
2893 \subsection{Redundancy Removal}
2894
2895 The redundancy removal dialog box is opened using the {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Remove Redundancy\ldots} option 
2896 in the alignment menu. As its menu option placement suggests, this is actually an alignment editing function, 
2897 but it is convenient to describe it here. The redundancy removal dialog box presents a percentage identity 
2898 slider which sets the redundancy threshold. Aligned sequences which exhibit a percentage identity greater 
2899 than the current threshold are highlighted in black. The [Remove] button can then be used to delete these 
2900 sequences from the alignment as an edit operation.
2901 \begin{figure}
2902 \begin{center}
2903 \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{images/redundancy.pdf}
2904 \end{center}
2905 \label{removeredundancydialog}
2906 \caption{The Redundancy Removal dialog box opened from the edit menu. Sequences that exceed the current percentage identity 
2907 threshold and are to be removed are highlighted in black.}
2908 \end{figure}
2909
2910
2911 \subsection{Subdividing the Alignment According to Specific Mutations}
2912
2913 It is often necessary to explore variations in an alignment that may correlate
2914 with mutations observed in a particular region; for example, sites exhibiting
2915 single nucleotide polymorphism, or residues involved in substrate recognition in
2916 an enzyme. One way to do this would be to calculate a tree using the specific
2917 region, and subdivide it in order to partition the alignment.
2918 However, calculating a tree can be slow for large alignments, and the tree may
2919 be difficult to partition when complex mutation patterns are being analysed. The
2920 {\sl Select $\Rightarrow$ Make groups for selection } function was introduced to
2921 make this kind of analysis easier. When selected, it will use the characters in
2922 the currently selected region to subdivide the alignment. For example, if a
2923 single column is selected, then the alignment (or each group defined on the
2924 alignment) will be divided into groups based on the residue or nucleotide found
2925 at that position. These new groups are annotated with the characters in the
2926 selected region, and Jalview's group based conservation analysis annotation and
2927 colourschemes can then be used to reveal any associated pattern of sequence
2928 variation across the whole alignment.
2929
2930
2931 % These annotations can be hidden and deleted via the context menu linked to the
2932 % annotation row; but they are only created on loading an alignment. If they are
2933 % deleted then the alignment should be saved and then reloaded to restore them.
2934 % Jalview provides a toggle to autocalculate a consensus sequence upon editing.
2935 % This is normally selected by default, but can be turned off for large alignments {\sl via} the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Autocalculate
2936 % Consensus} menu option if the interface is too slow.
2937
2938 % \subsubsection{Group Associated Annotation}
2939 % \label{groupassocannotation}
2940 % Group associated consensus and conservation annotation rows reflect the
2941 % sequence variation within a particular group. Their calculation is enabled
2942 % by selecting the {\sl Group Conservation} or {\sl Group Consensus} options in
2943 % the {\sl Annotation $\Rightarrow$ Autocalculated Annotation } submenu of the
2944 % alignment window. 
2945
2946 % \subsubsection{Alignment and Group Sequence Logos}
2947 % \label{seqlogos}
2948
2949 % The consensus annotation row that is shown below the alignment can be overlaid
2950 % with a sequence logo that reflects the symbol distribution at each column of
2951 % the alignment. Right click on the Consensus annotation row and select the {\sl
2952 % Show Logo} option to display the Consensus profile for the group or alignment.
2953 % Sequence logos can be enabled by default for all new alignments {\sl via} the
2954 % Visual tab in the Jalview desktop's preferences dialog box.
2955
2956 \section{Pairwise Alignments}
2957 Jalview can calculate optimal pairwise alignments between arbitrary 
2958 sequences {\sl via} the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Pairwise Alignments\ldots} menu option. 
2959 Global alignments of all pairwise combinations of the selected sequences are performed and the results returned in a text box.
2960
2961
2962
2963 \exercise{Remove Redundant Sequences}{
2964 \label{redundantex}
2965 \exstep{Using the alignment generated in the previous exercise (exercise
2966 \ref{consanalyexerc}).
2967 In the alignment window, you may need to deselect groups using Esc key.}
2968
2969 \exstep{In the {\sl Edit} menu select {\sl Remove Redundancy} to open the
2970 Redundancy threshold selection dialog. Adjust the redundancy threshold value, start
2971 at 50 and increase the value to 65. Sequences selected will change colour in the Sequence ID panel. Select ``Remove'' to
2972 remove the sequences that are more than 65\% similar under this alignment.}
2973
2974 \exstep{From the tree window, select {\sl View $\Rightarrow$
2975 Mark Unlinked Leaves} option, and note that the removed sequences are now prefixed with a * in the tree view.}
2976  \exstep{Use the [Undo] button in the Redundancy threshold selection dialog box
2977 to recover the sequences. Note that the * symbols disappear from the tree display.}
2978 \exstep{Experiment with the redundancy removal and observe the relationship between the percentage identity threshold and 
2979 the pattern of unlinked nodes in the tree display.}
2980 }
2981
2982 \exercise{Group Conservation Analysis}{
2983 \label{conservationex}
2984 \exstep{Re-use or recreate the alignment and tree which you worked with in the
2985 tree based conservation analysis exercise (exercise \ref{consanalyexerc}).} 
2986 \exstep{In the {\sl View} menu in the alignment window, select {\sl New View} to
2987 create a new view. Ensure the annotation panel is displayed ({\sl Annotations $\Rightarrow$ Show Annotations} is toggled on). Enable the
2988 display of {\sl Group Consensus} option by checking {\sl Group Consensus} in the {\sl Annotation $\Rightarrow$
2989 Autocalculated Annotation $\Rightarrow$
2990 Group Consensus} submenu.}
2991
2992 \exstep{Displaying the sequence 
2993 logos will make it easier to see the different residue populations within each
2994 group. Activate the logo by right clicking the name of the Consensus annotation to
2995 open the context menu and select the {\sl Show Logo} option. Alter its size, by moving the cursor onto the annotation row, right clicking the 
2996 mouse and dragging it up. Alter its position, by right clicking the name of the Consensus annotation 
2997 and dragging it up to the top of the annotations.} 
2998 \exstep{In the column alignment ruler, select a column exhibiting with about 50\%
2999   of its residues conserved ({\em ie. about 50\% in the consensus histogram})
3000   that lies within the central conserved region of the alignment.
3001 (Column 74 is used in \href{https://youtu.be/m-PjynicXRg}{the Tree video}).} 
3002 \exstep{Subdivide the alignment
3003 according to this selection using {\sl Select $\Rightarrow$ Make Groups for Selection}.}
3004 \exstep{Re-order the alignment according to the new groups that have been
3005 defined by selecting {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Sort $\Rightarrow$
3006 By Group}.
3007 Click on the group annotation row IDs to select groups exhibiting a
3008 specific mutation.}
3009 \exstep{Select another column exhibiting about 50\% conservation
3010 overall, and subdivide the alignment further. Note that the new groups
3011 inherit the names of the original groups, allowing you to identify the
3012 combination of mutations that resulted in the subdivision.}
3013 \exstep{Clear the groups, and try to subdivide the alignment using two
3014 non-adjacent columns.
3015
3016 {\sl Hint: You may need to hide the intervening columns before you can select
3017 both of the columns that you wish to use to subdivide the alignment.}}
3018 \exstep{Switch back to the original view, and experiment with subdividing
3019 the tree groups made in the previous exercise.}
3020 {\bf See the video at:
3021 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
3022 }
3023
3024 \begin{figure}[]
3025 \begin{center}
3026 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/pairwise.pdf}
3027 \caption{{\bf Pairwise alignment of sequences.} Pairwise alignments of three selected sequences are shown in a textbox.}
3028 \label{pairwise}
3029 \end{center}
3030 \end{figure}
3031
3032
3033 % To review, Chapter \ref{featannot} describes the mechanisms provided by
3034 % Jalview for interactive creation of sequence and alignment annotation, and how
3035 % they can be displayed, imported and exported and used to reorder the alignment. Chapter
3036 % \ref{featuresfromdb} discusses the retrieval of database references and
3037 % establishment of sequence coordinate systems for the retrieval and display of
3038 % features from databases and DAS annotation services.
3039 % Chapter \ref{msaservices} describes how to use the range of multiple alignment
3040 % programs provided by JABAWS, and Chapter \ref{aacons} introduces JABAWS AACon
3041 % service for protein multiple alignment conservation analysis.
3042 %  In Chapter \ref{alignanalysis}, you will find
3043 % descriptions and exercises on building and displaying trees, PCA analysis,
3044 % alignment redundancy removal, pairwise alignments and alignment conservation
3045 % analysis. 
3046 % Chapter \ref{wkwithstructure} introduces the structure visualization
3047 % capabilities of Jalview.
3048 % Chapter \ref{protsspredservices} explains how to perform protein secondary
3049 % structure predictions with JPred, and JABAWS protein disorder prediction
3050 % services are introduced in Chapter \ref{protdisorderpred}.
3051 % Chapter \ref{workingwithnuc} describes functions and visualization techniques
3052 % relevant to working with nucleotide sequences, coding region annotation and nucleotide
3053 % sequence alignments.
3054 % Chapter \ref{jvwebservices} introduces the various web based services
3055 % available to Jalview users, and Chapter \ref{jabaservices} explains how to
3056 % configure the Jalview Desktop for access to new JABAWS servers.
3057
3058
3059 % and Section \ref{workingwithrna} covers the visualization,
3060 % editing and analysis of RNA secondary structure.
3061
3062 \chapter{Working with 3D structures}
3063 \label{3Dstructure}
3064 \label{wkwithstructure}
3065 Jalview facilitates the use of 3D structure data for the analysis of alignments
3066 by providing a linked view of structures associated with the aligned sequences.
3067 It also allows sequence, secondary structure and B-factor data to be imported
3068 from structure files, and supports the use of the EMBL-EBI's SIFTS database to
3069 construct accurate mappings between UniProt protein sequences and structures
3070 retrieved from the PDB.
3071
3072 \section{Molecular graphics systems supported by Jalview}
3073 Jalview can interactively view 3D structure using Jmol, a Java based molecular
3074 viewing program\footnote{See the Jmol homepage \url{http://www.jmol.org} for
3075 more information.} integrated with Jalview.\footnote{Earlier
3076 versions of Jalview included MCView - a simple main chain structure viewer.
3077 Structures are visualized as an alpha carbon trace and can be viewed, rotated
3078 and coloured using the sequence alignment.} It also supports the use of UCSF
3079 Chimera, a powerful molecular graphics system that needs separate installation.
3080 Jalview can also read PDB and mmCIF format files directly to extract sequences
3081 and secondary structure information, and retrieve records from the European
3082 Protein Databank (PDBe) using the Sequence Fetcher (see \ref{fetchseq}).
3083
3084 \subsection{Configuring the default structure viewer}
3085 \label{configuring3dviewer}
3086 To configure which viewer is used when creating a new
3087 structure view, open the Structures preferences window {\sl via} {\sl Tools $\Rightarrow$ Preferences\ldots} and
3088 select either JMOL or CHIMERA as the default viewer. If you select Chimera,
3089 Jalview will search for the installed program, and if it cannot be found,
3090 you will be prompted to locate the Chimera binary, or alternately, open the UCSF
3091 Chimera download page to obtain the software.
3092
3093 \section{Automatic Association of PDB Structures with Sequences}
3094 Jalview will attempt to automatically determine which structures are associated
3095 with a sequence via its ID, and any associated database references. To do this
3096 for a particular sequence or the current selection, open the Sequence ID popup
3097 menu and select {\sl View 3D Structure}, to open the 3D Structure Chooser. 
3098 %(Figure\ref{auto}). 
3099
3100 When the structure chooser is first opened, if no database identifiers are
3101 available, Jalview will automatically perform a database reference
3102 retrieval (See \ref{fetchdbrefs}) to discover identifiers for the
3103 sequences to use to search the PDB. This can take a
3104 few seconds for each sequence and will be performed for all selected
3105 sequences.\footnote{After this is done, you can see the added database
3106 references in a tool tip by mousing over the sequence ID. You can use the {\sl
3107 View $\Rightarrow$ Sequence ID Tooltip $\Rightarrow$ Show Db References }
3108 submenu option to enable or disable these data in the tooltip.}
3109
3110 Once the retrieval has finished, the structure chooser dialog will show any
3111 available PDB entries for the selected sequences.
3112
3113
3114 % \begin{figure}[htbp]
3115 % \begin{center}
3116 % %TODO fix formatting
3117 % \begin{center} 
3118 % \includegraphics[width=3.5in]{images/pdbstructurechooser.pdf}
3119 % \end{center}
3120
3121
3122 % \caption{{\bf The PDB Structure Chooser dialog.} }
3123 % \label{auto}
3124 % \end{center}
3125 % \end{figure}
3126
3127 \subsection{Drag-and-Drop Association of PDB Files with Sequences by Filename
3128 Match}
3129 \label{multipdbfileassoc}
3130 If you have PDB files stored on your computer {\bf named the same way as the
3131 sequences in the alignment}, then you can drag them from their location on the
3132 file browser onto an alignment window. Jalview will search the alignment for
3133 sequences with IDs that match any of the files, and offer a dialog like the one
3134 in Figure \ref{multipdbfileassocfig}.
3135
3136 If no associations are made, then sequences extracted
3137 from the structure will be simply added to the alignment. However, if only
3138 some of the PDB files are associated, Jalview will raise another dialog box
3139 giving you the option to add any remaining sequences from the PDB structure files not present in
3140 the alignment. This allows you to easily decorate sequences in a newly imported
3141 alignment with any corresponding structures you've already collected in a directory
3142 accessible from your computer.\footnote{We plan to extend this facility in
3143 future so Jalview will automatically search for PDB files matching your
3144 sequence within a local directory. Check out 
3145 \href{http://issues.jalview.org/browse/JAL-801}{Jalview issue 801}}
3146
3147 After associating sequences with PDB files, you can view the PDB structures by
3148 opening the Sequence ID popup
3149 menu and selecting {\sl View 3D Structure}. The PDB files you loaded will be
3150 shown in the {\bf Cached Structures} view, after selecting it from the drop down
3151 menu in the dialog box. 
3152
3153 % there is no mention of the other footnote (#3) that appears saying: Tip: The sequence ID tooltip can often become large for heavily cross-referenced sequence IDs. Use the ...
3154 % JBP: yes there is - under 'Discovery of ' subsection.
3155 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3156 \begin{center}
3157 \includegraphics[]{images/pdbdragdropassoc.pdf}
3158
3159 \caption{{\bf Associating PDB files with sequences by drag-and-drop.} Dragging
3160 PDB files onto an alignment of sequences with names matching the dragged files
3161 names (A), results in a dialog box (B) that gives the option to associate each
3162 file with any sequences with matching IDs. }
3163 \label{multipdbfileassocfig}
3164 \end{center}
3165 \end{figure}
3166
3167
3168 \section{Viewing Structures}
3169 \label{structurechooser}
3170 The structure viewer is launched via the Sequence ID context
3171 menu. To view structures associated with a sequence or a selected set of
3172 sequences in the alignment, simply right click the mouse to open the context
3173 menu, and select {\sl 3D Structure data \ldots} to open the Structure Chooser
3174 dialog box. 
3175
3176 If any of
3177 the {\bf currently selected} sequences have structures in the PDB, 
3178 they will appear in the Structure Chooser dialog box. The structures can be ranked by
3179 different parameters, but are by default ordered according to their PDB
3180 quality score. 
3181
3182 To view one or more structures, simply click {\sl
3183 View} to open a structure viewer containing the structures selected in the
3184 dialog. If several structures were picked, these will be shown
3185 superposed according to the alignment.
3186 You may find Jalview has already picked the best structure - using one of the
3187 criteria shown in the dropdown menu (e.g. 'Best Quality', which is picked by
3188 default). However, you are free to select your own.
3189
3190 The structure(s) to be displayed will be downloaded or loaded from
3191 the local file system, and shown as a ribbon diagram coloured according to the
3192 associated sequence in the current alignment view (Figure \ref{structure}). The structure can be rotated by clicking and dragging in the structure
3193 window. The structure can be zoomed using the mouse scroll wheel or by
3194 [SHIFT]-dragging the structure.
3195
3196 Moving the mouse cursor over a sequence to which the structure is linked in the
3197 alignment view highlights the respective residue's sidechain atoms. The
3198 sidechain highlight may be obscured by other parts of the molecule. Similarly,
3199 moving the cursor over the structure shows a tooltip and highlights the
3200 corresponding residue in the alignment. Clicking the alpha carbon or phosphorous
3201 backbone atom will toggle the highlight and residue label on and off. Often, the
3202 position highlighted in the sequence may not be in the visible portion of the
3203 current alignment view and the sliders will scroll automatically to show the
3204 position. If the alignment window's {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Automatic Scrolling
3205 } option is not selected, however, then the automatic adjustment will be
3206 disabled for the current view.
3207
3208 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3209 \begin{center}
3210 \parbox{4in}{
3211 {\centering 
3212 \begin{center}
3213 \includegraphics[width=4in]{images/structure1.pdf}
3214 \end{center}
3215 }
3216 }
3217 \parbox{2.2in}{
3218 {\centering 
3219 \begin{center}
3220 \includegraphics[width=2.2in]{images/structure2.pdf}
3221 \end{center}
3222 }
3223 }
3224 \caption{{\bf Structure visualization} Structure viewers are launched from
3225 the 3D Structure chooser dialog (left). Jalview shows the displayed structures
3226 coloured according the alignment view (right). }
3227 \label{structure}
3228 \end{center}
3229 \end{figure}
3230
3231 \subsection{Customising Structure Display}
3232
3233 Structure display can be modified using the {\sl Colour} and {\sl View} menus
3234 in the structure viewer. The background colour can be modified by selecting the
3235 {\sl Colours $\Rightarrow$ Background Colour\ldots} option.
3236
3237 By default, the structure will be coloured in the same way as the associated
3238 sequence(s) in the alignment view from which it was launched. The structure can
3239 be coloured independently of the sequence by selecting an appropriate colour
3240 scheme from the {\sl Colours} menu. It can be coloured according to the
3241 alignment using the {\sl Colours $\Rightarrow$ By Sequence } option. The image
3242 in the structure viewer can be saved as an EPS or PNG with the {\sl File
3243 $\Rightarrow$ Save As $\Rightarrow$ \ldots} submenu, which also allows the raw
3244 data to be saved as PDB format. The mapping between the structure and the
3245 sequence (how well and which parts of the structure relate to the sequence) can
3246 be viewed with the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ View Mapping} menu option.
3247
3248 \subsubsection{Using the Jmol Visualization Interface }
3249
3250 Jmol has a comprehensive set of selection and visualization functions that are
3251 accessed from the Jmol popup menu (by right-clicking in the Jmol window or by
3252 clicking the Jmol logo). Molecule colour and rendering style can be manipulated,
3253 and distance measurements and molecular surfaces can be added to the view. It
3254 also has its own ``Rasmol\footnote{See \url{http://www.rasmol.org}}-like'' scripting
3255 language, which is described elsewhere\footnote{Jmol Wiki:
3256 \url{http://wiki.jmol.org/index.php/Scripting}
3257
3258 Jmol Scripting reference:
3259 \url{http://www.stolaf.edu/academics/chemapps/jmol/docs/}}. Jalview utilises the
3260 scripting language to interact with Jmol and to store the state of a Jmol
3261 visualization within Jalview archives, in addition to the PDB data file
3262 originally loaded or retrieved by Jalview. To access the Jmol scripting
3263 environment directly, use the {\sl Jmol $\Rightarrow$ Console} menu option.
3264
3265 If you would prefer to use Jmol to manage structure colours, then select the
3266 {\sl Colours $\Rightarrow$ Colour with Jmol} option. This will disable any
3267 automatic application of colour schemes when new structure data is added, or
3268 when associated alignment views are modified.
3269
3270 \exercise{Viewing Structures with the integrated Jmol Viewer}{
3271 \label{viewingstructex}
3272 \exstep{Load the alignment at
3273 \textsf{http://www.jalview.org/examples/exampleFile.jvp}.}
3274 \exstep{Right-click on the
3275 sequence ID label of {\sl FER1\_SPIOL} to open
3276 the ID popup menu and select {\sl 3D Structure Data}. After a short pause, a
3277 Structure Chooser dialog will open for the sequence, listing available
3278 structure data from the PDB. Select { \sl 1a70} from the list and click {\sl
3279 New View}.
3280
3281 {\sl Note:} The Structure Chooser dialog presents available PDB structures
3282 by querying the EMBL-EBI's PDBe web API. Extra information can be
3283 including in this window by checking boxes in the columns of the {\sl Customise Displayed Options} tab.
3284 % JBP Note: Bug JAL-1238 needs to be fixed ASAP
3285 }
3286 \exstep{By default the Jmol
3287 structure viewer opens in the Jalview desktop. Rotate the molecule by clicking
3288 and dragging in the structure viewing box.
3289 Zoom with the mouse scroll wheel. } 
3290 \exstep{In the Jmol viewer, placing the mouse over a
3291 part of the structure will bring up a tool tip indicating the name and number of that residue.
3292 In the alignment window, the corresponding residue in the sequence is
3293 highlighted in black.}
3294 \exstep{Roll the
3295 mouse cursor along the {\sl FER1\_SPIOL} sequence in the alignment window.
3296 If a residue in the sequence maps to one in the structure, the residue molecular shape is visible in the structure viewer.}
3297 \exstep{Clicking the alpha carbon toggles the highlight and residue label on and
3298 off.
3299 Try this by clicking on a set of three or four adjacent residues so that the labels are persistent, then finding where they are in the sequence. }
3300 \exstep{In the structure viewer menu, select {\sl Colours $\Rightarrow$ Background
3301 Colour\ldots} and choose a suitable colour.
3302 Press {\sl OK} to apply this.}
3303 \exstep{Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save As $\Rightarrow$ PNG} and save the
3304 image. On your computer, view this with a suitable program. } 
3305 \exstep{Select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ View Mapping} from the structure viewer menu.
3306 A new window opens showing the residue by residue alignment between the sequence and the structure.} 
3307 \exstep{In the structure window,  select {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save as $\Rightarrow$ PDB file} and enter a filename to save the PDB file. 
3308 Once the file is saved, open the location in your file browser and drag the PDB file that you just saved onto the Jalview desktop.
3309 (Or load it from the Jalview Desktop menu using
3310 {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Input Alignment $\Rightarrow$ From File}). 
3311 Verify that you can open and view the associated structure from new alignment window using the sequence ID
3312 context menu's {\sl 3D Structure } submenu (as step {\sl b)}.}
3313
3314 \exstep{In the Jmol window, right click on the background to open the
3315 Jmol menu options. Explore this, for example by
3316 {\sl Select (n) $\Rightarrow$ All} command (where {\sl n} is the number of residues selected), 
3317 and then the {\sl Style $\Rightarrow$ Scheme $\Rightarrow$ Ball and Stick} command.} 
3318 \exstep{In the alignment window, use the {\sl File $\Rightarrow$ Save as.. }
3319 function to save the alignment as a Jalview Project (jvp). Now close the alignment and the structure view, and load the project file you just saved.
3320 Verify that the Jmol display is as it was when you just saved the file.}
3321 {\bf See the video at:
3322 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
3323 }
3324
3325 \exercise{Aligning Structures using the Ferredoxin Sequence Alignment}{
3326 \label{superpositionex}
3327
3328 \exstep{Continue with the Jalview project created in exercise
3329 \ref{viewingstructex}}
3330
3331 \exstep{Select the FER1\_MAIZE sequence (near bottom of the alignment). Right-click the ID label to open the context menu, 
3332 select {\sl $\Rightarrow$ 3D Structure Data}.}
3333
3334 \exstep{This opens the Structure Chooser dialog, pick 1gaq from the list.
3335 Make sure the {\sl Superpose} option is checked before clicking the {\bf Add}
3336 button. This superimpose the structure associated with
3337 FER1\_MAIZE with the one associated with FER1\_SPIOL.
3338
3339 {\sl Note:} The Jmol view should update to show both structures, and one will be
3340 moved on to the other. If this doesn't happen, use the Align function in the
3341 Jmol submenu.
3342 }
3343
3344 \exstep{Create a new view on the alignment ({\sl View $\Rightarrow$ New View}), and hide all but columns 121
3345 through to 132 ({\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Hide $\Rightarrow$
3346 All but selected region}).}
3347 \exstep{Select the newly created view in the structure window using {\sl Jmol $\Rightarrow$ Superpose
3348 With } submenu, and then recompute the superposition with {\sl Jmol
3349 $\Rightarrow$ Superpose Structures}.
3350
3351 {\sl Note:} how the molecules shift position when superposed with only a small
3352 region of the alignment.}
3353
3354 \exstep{Compare RMSDs obtained when superimposing molecules with
3355 columns 121-132 and with the whole alignment. The RMSD report can be
3356 viewed by right clicking the mouse on Jmol window, and select {\sl
3357 Console} from the menu (if nothing is shown, recompute the superposition after
3358 displaying the console).}
3359 \exstep{Which view do you think give the best 3D superposition, and why ?} }
3360
3361 \exercise{Setting Chimera as the default 3D Structure Viewer}{
3362 \label{viewingchimera} 
3363 Jalview supports molecular structure
3364 visualization using both Jmol and Chimera 3D viewers. Jmol is the default
3365 viewer, however Chimera can be set up as the default choice from Preferences.
3366
3367 \exstep{First, Chimera must be downloaded and installed on the computer.
3368 Chimera program is available on the UCSF web site \textsf{https://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/download.html}.}
3369 \exstep{In the desktop menu, select {\sl Tool  $\Rightarrow$ Preferences}. In
3370 the ``{\sl
3371 Structure}'' tab set {\sl Default structure viewer} as {\sl
3372 Chimera}; then click {\sl OK}.} 
3373 \exstep{Close the Jalview program, from the
3374 {\sl Desktop menu} select {\sl Jalview $\Rightarrow$ Quit Jalview}. Then reopen
3375 Jalview, Chimera should open as the default viewer.}
3376 If this does not work then you may need to set the {\sl Path to Chimera program} in {\sl Preferences}.
3377 {\sl Note:} The Jmol structure viewer sits within the Jalview desktop. However
3378 the Chimera structure viewer sits outside the Jalview desktop and a Chimera
3379 view window sits inside the Jalview desktop.
3380
3381 {\bf See the video at: \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}}
3382
3383
3384 \subsection{Superimposing Structures}
3385 \label{superposestructs}
3386 Many comparative biomolecular analysis investigations aim to determine if the
3387 biochemical properties of a given molecule are significantly different to its
3388 homologues. When structure data is available, comparing the shapes of molecules
3389 by superimposing them enables substructure that may impart different behaviour
3390 to be quickly identified. The identification of optimal 3D superposition
3391 involves aligning 3D data rather than sequence symbols, but the result can
3392 still be represented as a sequence alignment, where columns indicate positions
3393 in each molecule that should be superposed to recreate the optimal 3D alignment.
3394
3395 Jalview can employ Jmol's 3D fitting routines\footnote{See
3396 \href{http://chemapps.stolaf.edu/jmol/docs/?ver=12.2$\#$compare}{http://chemapps.stolaf.edu/jmol/docs/?ver=12.2$\#$compare}
3397 for more information.} to recreate 3D structure superpositions based on the
3398 correspondences defined by one or more sequence alignments involving structures shown in the Jmol display. 
3399 Superposition based on the currently displayed alignment view
3400  happens automatically if a
3401 structure is added to an existing Jmol display using 
3402 the {\sl 3D Structure } option in the Sequence ID popup menu to open the
3403 Structure Chooser dialog box.
3404 Select the structures required and select {\sl View}. A new Jmol view
3405 opens containing superposed structures if the current selection contains two or more sequences with associated
3406 structures.
3407
3408 \subsubsection{Obtaining the RMSD for a Superposition}
3409 The RMSD (Root Mean Square Deviation) is a measure of how similar the structures
3410 are when they are superimposed. Figure \ref{mstrucsuperposition} shows a
3411 superposition created during the course of Exercise \ref{superpositionex}. The
3412 parts of each molecule used to construct the superposition are rendered using
3413 the cartoon style, with other parts of the molecule drawn in wireframe. The Jmol
3414 console, which has been opened after the superposition was performed, shows the
3415 RMSD report for the superposition.
3416 Full information about the superposition is also reported on the Jalview
3417 console.\footnote{The Jalview Java Console is opened from {\sl Tools
3418 $\Rightarrow$ Java Console} option in the Desktop's menu bar} This output also
3419 includes the precise atom pairs used to superpose structures.
3420
3421 \subsubsection{Choosing which part of the Alignment is used for Structural
3422 Superposition} Jalview uses the visible part of each alignment view to define
3423 which parts of each molecule are to be superimposed. Hiding a column in a view
3424 used for superposition will remove that correspondence from the set, and will
3425 exclude it from the superposition and RMSD calculation.
3426 This allows the selection of specific parts of the alignment to be used for
3427 superposition. Only columns that define a complete set of correspondences for
3428 all structures will be used for structural superposition, and as a consequence,
3429 the RMSD values generated for each pair of structures superimposed can be
3430 directly compared.
3431
3432 In order to recompute a superposition after changing a view or editing the
3433 alignment, select the {\sl Jmol $\Rightarrow$ Align Structures} menu option.
3434 The {\sl Jmol $\Rightarrow$ Superpose with ..} submenu allows you to choose which of the
3435 associated alignments and views are to be used to create the set of
3436 correspondences. This menu is useful when composing complex superpositions
3437 involving multi-domain and multi-chain complexes, when correspondences may be
3438 defined by more than one alignment.
3439
3440 Note that these menu options appear when you have two or more structures in one Jmol viewer.
3441
3442 \subsection{Colouring Structure Data Associated with Multiple Alignments and
3443 Views} Normally, the original view from which a particular structure view was
3444 opened will be the one used to colour structure data. If alignments involving
3445 sequences associated with structure data shown in a Jmol have multiple views, Jalview gives you full control
3446 over which alignment, or alignment view, is used to colour the structure
3447 display. Sequence-structure colouring associations are
3448 changed {\sl via} the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Colour by ..} menu, which lists all
3449 views associated with data shown in the embedded Jmol view. A tick is shown beside
3450 views currently used as colouring source, and moving the
3451 mouse over each view will bring it to the front of the alignment display,
3452 allowing you to browse available colour sources prior to selecting one. If the
3453 {\sl Select many views} option is selected, then multiple views can be selected as sources for colouring the
3454 structure data. {\sl Invert selection} and {\sl Select all views} options are also provided to quickly change between multi-view selections.
3455
3456 Note that the {\sl Select many views} option is useful if you have different
3457 views that colour different areas or domains of the alignment. This option is
3458 further explored in exercise \ref{complexstructurecolours}.
3459
3460 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3461 \begin{center}
3462 \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{images/fdxsuperposition.pdf}
3463 \caption{{\bf Superposition of two ferredoxin structures.} The alignment on the
3464 left was used by Jalview to superpose structures associated with the
3465 FER1\_SPIOL and FER1\_MAIZE sequences in the alignment. Parts of each structure
3466 used for superposition are rendered as a cartoon, the remainder rendered in
3467 wireframe. The RMSD between corresponding positions in the structures before and
3468 after the superposition is shown in the Jmol console.}
3469 \label{mstrucsuperposition}
3470 \end{center}
3471 \end{figure}
3472
3473 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3474 \begin{center}
3475 \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{images/mviewstructurecol.pdf}
3476 \caption{{\bf Choosing a different view for colouring a structure display}
3477 Browsing the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Colour by ..} menu provides full control
3478 of which alignment view is used to colour structures when the {\sl Colours
3479 $\Rightarrow$ By Sequence} option is selected.}
3480 \label{mviewstructurecol}
3481 \end{center}
3482 \end{figure}
3483
3484 \subsubsection{Colouring Complexes}
3485 \label{complexstructurecolours}
3486 The ability to control which multiple alignment view is used to colour
3487 structural data is essential when working with data relating to
3488 multidomain biomolecules and complexes. 
3489
3490 In these situations, each chain identified in the structure may have a different
3491 evolutionary history, and a complete picture of functional variation can
3492 only be gained by integrating data from different alignments on the same
3493 structure view. An example of this is shown in Figure
3494 \ref{mviewalcomplex}, based on data from Song et. al.\footnote{Structure of
3495 DNMT1-DNA Complex Reveals a Role for Autoinhibition in Maintenance DNA Methylation. Jikui Song, Olga Rechkoblit, Timothy H. Bestor, and Dinshaw J. Patel.
3496 {\sl Science} 2011 {\bf 331} 1036-1040
3497 \href{http://www.sciencemag.org/content/331/6020/1036}{DOI:10.1126/science.1195380}}
3498
3499 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3500 \begin{center}
3501 \includegraphics[]{images/mchainstructureview.pdf}
3502 \caption{{\bf The biological assembly of Mouse DNA Methyltransferase-1 coloured
3503 by Pfam alignments for its major domains} Alignments for each domain within the
3504 Uniprot sequence DNMT1\_MOUSE have been used to visualise sequence conservation
3505 in each component of this protein-DNA complex. Instructions for recreating this figure are given in exercise \ref{dnmtcomplexex}. }
3506 \label{mviewalcomplex}
3507 \end{center}
3508 \end{figure}
3509
3510 \exercise{Colouring a Protein Complex to Explore Domain-Domain
3511 Interfaces}{\label{dnmtcomplexex}
3512
3513 \exstep{Download the PDB file at
3514 \textsf{\url{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/DNMT1\_MOUSE.pdb}} to your desktop. 
3515 This is the biological unit for PDB ID 3pt6, as identified by the PDBe's PISA
3516 server.}
3517
3518 \exstep{Retrieve the following PFAM alignments from the {\bf PFAM (full)} source
3519 :
3520
3521 PF02008; PF01426; PF00145 (retrieve each into their own alignment window).}
3522
3523 \exstep{Drag the URL or file of the structure you
3524 downloaded in step 1 onto one of the alignments to associate it with the mouse sequence in that Pfam domain family.}
3525
3526 \exstep{Locate every DNMT1\_MOUSE sequence in the
3527 alignment by opening the Find dialog box via {\sl Select
3528 $\Rightarrow$ Find}. Search using the text DNMT1\_MOUSE. Open the Structure Chooser dialog box 
3529 by right clicking the mouse on
3530 sequence name to open the context menu and select {\sl
3531 $\Rightarrow$ 3D Structure Data}.
3532 Select `Cached Structures' from
3533 the drop-down menu in the Structure Chooser dialog box and select the
3534 DNMT1\_MOUSE.pdb structure, and click {\sl New View}.
3535
3536 {\em Part of the newly opened structure will be coloured the same way as
3537 the associated DNMT1\_MOUSE sequence is in the alignment view.}
3538
3539 {\bf WARNING: do not select all sequences and open the Structure Chooser
3540 !} {\em This will cause Jalview to attempt to discover all structures for
3541 sequences in the alignment.}
3542 }
3543 \exstep{Repeat the previous two steps for the other two
3544   alignments. For those, after selecting the DNMT1\_MOUSE.pdb structure you
3545   should select {\bf `Add'} to ensure each domain alignment is associated
3546   with the {\bf same} Jmol view. }
3547
3548 \exstep{Pick a different
3549 colourscheme in each alignment window for each alignment using the {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ Colour by...} submenu to
3550 ensure each of the complexes shown in the Jmol window are coloured.
3551 {\sl The different shading schemes will highlight regions of strong 
3552 physicochemical conservation on corresponding domains in the structure.}
3553 }
3554
3555 \exstep{The final step needed to reproduce the shading in Figure
3556 \ref{mviewalcomplex} is to use the {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ By
3557 Annotation\ldots } option in each alignment window to shade the alignment by the
3558 {\bf Conservation} annotation row (introduced in section
3559 \ref{colourbyannotation}).
3560
3561 {\sl Note:} Ensure that you first disable the {\sl View $\Rightarrow$ Show Features} menu
3562 option, or you may not see any colour changes in the associated structure.
3563
3564 {\sl Examine the regions strongly coloured at the interfaces between each
3565 protein domain, and the DNA binding region. What do you think these patterns
3566 mean? } }
3567 \exstep{Save your work as a Jalview project and verify that it can be opened
3568 again by starting another Jalview Desktop instance, and dragging the saved
3569 project into the Desktop window.}
3570
3571 % {\sl Note: This exercise relies on new features introduced in Jalview 2.7. If
3572 % you notice any strange behaviour when trying out this exercise, it may be a
3573 % bug (see
3574 % \href{http://issues.jalview.org/browse/JAL-1008}{http://issues.jalview.org/browse/JAL-1008}
3575 % for one relating to highlighting of positions in the alignment window).}
3576 }
3577
3578 % TODO
3579 \chapter{Protein sequence analysis and structure prediction}
3580 \label{proteinprediction}
3581
3582 Many of Jalview's sequence feature and annotation capabilities were developed to
3583 allow the results of sequence based protein structure prediction methods to be
3584 visualised and explored. This chapter introduces services integrated with the
3585 Jalview Desktop for predicting protein secondary structure and protein disorder.
3586
3587 \section{Protein Secondary Structure Prediction}
3588 \label{protsspredservices}
3589 Protein secondary structure prediction is performed using the
3590 Jpred\footnote{{\sl ``The Jpred 3 Secondary Structure Prediction Server''} Cole,
3591 C., Barber, J. D. and Barton, G. J. (2008) {\sl Nucleic Acids Research} {\bf
3592 36}, (Web Server Issue) W197-W201
3593
3594 {\sl ``Jpred: A Consensus Secondary Structure Prediction Server''} Cuff, J. A.,
3595 Clamp, M. E., Siddiqui, A. S., Finlay, M. and Barton, G. J. (1998) {\sl
3596 Bioinformatics} {\bf 14}, 892-893} server at the University of
3597 Dundee\footnote{http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/www-jpred/}. The behaviour of
3598 this calculation depends on the current selection:
3599 \begin{list}{$\circ$}{}
3600 \item If nothing is selected, Jalview will check the length of each alignment row to determine if the visible sequences in the view are aligned.
3601 \begin{list}{-}{}
3602               \item If all rows are the same length (often due to the
3603               application of the {\sl Edit $\Rightarrow$ Pad Gaps} option), then
3604               a JPred prediction will be run for the first sequence in the
3605               alignment, using the current alignment as the profile to use for prediction.
3606               \item  Otherwise, just the first sequence will be submitted for a
3607               full JPred prediction.
3608 \end{list}
3609 \item If just one sequence (or a region in one sequence) has been selected, it
3610 will be submitted to the automatic JPred prediction server for homolog detection
3611 and prediction.
3612 \item If a set of sequences are selected, and they appear to be aligned using
3613 the same criteria as above, then the alignment will be used for a JPred
3614 prediction on the first sequence in the set (that is, the one that appears first in the alignment window).
3615 \end{list}
3616
3617 \exercise{Secondary Structure Prediction}{
3618 \label{secstrpredex}
3619
3620 {\sl Note:} The annotation panel can get quite busy during this exercise. Try
3621 hiding some annotations rows by right clicking
3622 the mouse in the annotation label panel and select the ``Hide this row'' option.
3623 The Annotations dropdown menu on the alignment window also provides options for
3624 reordering and hiding autocalculated and sequence associated annotation. 
3625
3626 \exstep{ Open the alignment at \url{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/alignment.fa}. Select the sequence {\sl FER\_MESCR} by 
3627 clicking on the sequence ID. Then select {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$
3628 Secondary Structure Prediction $\Rightarrow$ JPred Secondary Structure
3629 Prediction} from the alignment window menu. A status window will appear and after some time (about 2-4 min) 
3630 a new window with the JPred prediction will appear. The results
3631 from the prediction are visible in the annotation panel. JPred secondary
3632 structure prediction annotations are examples of sequence-associated alignment annotation. {\sl Note:} The number of sequences in the results 
3633 window is many more than in the original alignment as 
3634 JPred performs a PSI-BLAST search to expand the prediction dataset.}
3635 % TODO: check how long this takes - about 2 mins once it gets on the cluster.
3636 \exstep{
3637 Select a different sequence and perform a JPred prediction in the same way.
3638 There will probably be minor differences in the predictions.
3639 }
3640 \exstep{
3641 Select the sequence used in the second sequence prediction by clicking on its
3642 name in the sequence ID panel, and copy {\sl ([CTRL] or [CMD]-C)} and then
3643 paste it {\sl [CTRL] or [CMD]-V)} into the first prediction window.  You
3644 can now compare the two predictions as the annotations associated with the
3645 sequence has also been copied across.
3646 % which is described in Section \ref{seqassocannot} below.
3647 }
3648 \exstep{
3649 Select and hide some columns in one of the alignment profiles that were returned
3650 from the JNet service, and then submit the profile for prediction again.
3651 }
3652 \exstep{
3653 When you get the result, verify that the prediction has not been made for the
3654 hidden parts of the profile by clicking the mouse on column ruler and right click to open the
3655 context menu and select {\sl Reveal All}. The JPred reliability scores
3656 differ from the prediction made on the full profile.
3657 }
3658 \exstep{
3659 In the original alignment that you loaded in step {\sl a}, select {\bf all}
3660 sequences ([CTRL]-A or [CMD]-A), then open the {\sl Sequence ID $\Rightarrow$ Selection $\Rightarrow$ Add
3661 Reference Annotation} submenu
3662 by right clicking the mouse to open the context menu.
3663 {\bf All} the JPred predictions for the sequences will now be visible in the
3664 original alignment window.}
3665  {\bf Homework:} Go back to the last step of exercise \ref{annotatingalignex} and
3666 follow the instructions to view the Jalview annotations file created from the annotations
3667 generated by the JPred server for your sequence.
3668 \bf See the video at:
3669 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
3670
3671 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3672 \begin{center}
3673 \includegraphics[width=2.25in]{images/jpred1.pdf}
3674 \includegraphics[width=3in]{images/jpred2.pdf}
3675 \caption{{\bf Secondary Structure Prediction} Status (left) and results (right)
3676 windows for JPred predictions. }
3677 \label{jpred}
3678 \end{center}
3679 \end{figure}
3680
3681
3682 Jpred is launched in the same way as the other web services. Select {\sl Web
3683 Service $\Rightarrow$ Secondary Structure Prediction $\Rightarrow$ JPred
3684 Secondary Structure Prediction}\footnote{JNet is the Neural Network based
3685 secondary structure prediction method that the JPred server uses.} from the
3686 alignment window menu (Figure \ref{jpred}).
3687 A status window opens to inform you of the progress of the job. Upon completion, a new alignment window opens and the Jpred
3688 predictions are included as annotations. Consult the Jpred documentation for
3689 information on interpreting these results.
3690
3691 \subsection{Hidden Columns and JPred Predictions}
3692 \label{hcoljnet}
3693 Hidden columns can be used to exclude parts of a sequence or profile from the
3694 input sent to the JNet service. For instance, if a sequence is known to include
3695 a large loop insertion, hiding that section prior to submitting the JNet
3696 prediction can produce different results. In some cases, these secondary
3697 structure predictions can be more reliable for sequence on either side of the
3698 insertion\footnote{This, of course, cannot be guaranteed.}. Prediction results
3699 returned from the service will be mapped back onto the visible parts of the
3700 sequence, to ensure a single frame of reference is maintained in your analysis.
3701
3702 \section{Protein Disorder Prediction}
3703 \label{protdisorderpred}
3704
3705 Disordered regions in proteins were classically thought to correspond to
3706 ``linkers'' between distinct protein domains, but disorder can also play a role in
3707 function. The {\sl Web Service $\Rightarrow$ Disorder} menu in the alignment window
3708 allows access to protein disorder prediction services provided by the configured
3709 JABAWS servers. 
3710
3711 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3712 \begin{center}
3713 \includegraphics[width=5in]{images/disorderpredannot.pdf}
3714 \caption{{\bf Annotation rows for several disorder predictions on a sequence}. A
3715 zoomed out view of a prediction for a single sequence. The sequence is shaded to highlight disordered regions (brown and grey), and the line plots below the Sequence show the raw scores for various disorder predictors. Horizontal lines on each graph mark the level at which disorder predictions become significant. }
3716 \label{alignmentdisorderannot}
3717 \end{center}
3718 \end{figure}
3719
3720 \subsection{Disorder Prediction Results}
3721 Each service operates on sequences in the alignment to identify regions likely
3722 to be unstructured or flexible, or alternately, fold to form globular domains.
3723 As a consequence, disorder predictor results include both sequence features and
3724 sequence associated alignment annotation rows. Section \ref{featannot} describes
3725 the manipulation and display of these data in detail, and Figure
3726 \ref{alignmentdisorder} demonstrates how sequence feature shading and
3727 thresholding (described in Section \ref{featureschemes}) can be used to
3728 highlight differences in disorder prediction across aligned sequences.
3729
3730
3731 \subsection{Navigating Large Sets of Disorder Predictions}
3732
3733 Figure \ref{alignmentdisorderannot} shows a single sequence annotated with
3734 a range of disorder predictions. Disorder prediction annotation rows are
3735 associated with a sequence in the same way as secondary structure prediction
3736 results. When browsing an alignment containing large numbers of disorder
3737 prediction annotation rows, clicking on the annotation row label will highlight
3738 the associated sequence in the alignment display, and double clicking will
3739 select that sequence.
3740
3741 \subsection{Disorder Predictors provided by JABAWS 2.0}
3742 For full details of each predictor and the results that Jalview can display,
3743 please consult
3744 \href{http://www.jalview.org/help/html/webServices/proteinDisorder.html}{Jalview's
3745 protein disorder service documentation}. Short descriptions of the methods provided in JABAWS 2.0 are given below:
3746
3747 \subsubsection{DisEMBL}
3748 \href{http://dis.embl.de/}{DisEMBL (Linding et al., 2003)} is a set of machine-learning based predictors trained to
3749 recognise disorder-related annotation found on PDB structures.
3750
3751 \textbf{COILS} Predicts
3752 loops/coils according to DSSP
3753 definitions\footnote{DSSP Classifications of secondary structure are: $\alpha$-helix (H), 310-helix (G), $\beta$-strand (E)
3754 are ordered, and all other states ($\beta$-bridge (B), $\beta$-turn (T), bend (S),
3755 $\pi$-helix (I), and coil (C)) considered loops or coils.}. Features mark range(s) of
3756 residues predicted as loops/coils, and annotation row gives raw value
3757 for each residue. Value over 0.516 indicates loop/coil.
3758
3759 \textbf{HOTLOOPS} constitute a refined subset of \textbf{COILS}, namely those loops with
3760 a high degree of mobility as determined from C$\alpha$ temperature factors (B
3761 factors). It follows that highly dynamic loops should be considered
3762 protein disorder. Features mark range(s) of residues predicted to
3763 be hot loops and annotation row gives raw value for each
3764 residue. Values over 0.6 indicates hot loop.
3765
3766 \textbf{REMARK465} ``Missing
3767 coordinates in X-ray structure as defined by remark465 entries in PDB.
3768 Nonassigned electron densities most often reflect intrinsic disorder,
3769 and have been used early on in disorder prediction'' . Features give
3770 range(s) of residues predicted as disordered, and annotation rows gives
3771 raw value for each residue. Values over 0.1204 indicates disorder.
3772
3773 \begin{figure}[htbp]
3774 \begin{center}
3775 \includegraphics[width=5in]{images/disorderpred.pdf}
3776 \caption{{\bf Shading alignment by sequence disorder}. Alignment of Interleukin IV homologs coloured with Blosum62 with protein 
3777 disorder prediction sequence features overlaid, shaded according to their score. Borderline disordered regions appear white, 
3778 reliable predictions are either Green or Brown depending on the type of disorder prediction. }
3779 \label{alignmentdisorder}
3780 \end{center}
3781 \end{figure}
3782
3783 \subsubsection{RONN {\sl a.k.a.} Regional Order Neural Network}
3784 \href{http://www.strubi.ox.ac.uk/RONN}{RONN} employs an approach
3785 known as the `bio-basis' method to predict regions of disorder in
3786 sequences based on their local similarity with a gold-standard set of
3787 disordered protein sequences. It yields a set of disorder prediction
3788 scores, which are shown as sequence annotation below the alignment.
3789
3790 \textbf{JRonn}\footnote{JRonn denotes the score for this server because JABAWS
3791 runs a Java port of RONN developed by Peter Troshin and distributed as
3792 part of \href{http://www.biojava.org/}{Biojava 3}} Annotation Row gives RONN score for each residue in
3793 the sequence. Scores above 0.5 identify regions of the protein likely
3794 to be disordered.
3795
3796 \subsubsection{IUPred}
3797 \href{http://iupred.enzim.hu/Help.php}{IUPred} employs
3798 an empirical model to estimate likely regions of disorder. There are
3799 three different prediction types offered, each using different
3800 parameters optimized for slightly different applications. It provides
3801 raw scores based on two models for predicting regions of `long
3802 disorder' and `short disorder'. A third predictor identifies regions
3803 likely to form structured domains.
3804
3805 \textbf{Long disorder} Annotation rows predict
3806 context-independent global disorder that encompasses at least 30
3807 consecutive residues of predicted disorder. A 100 residue
3808 window is used for calculation. Values above 0.5 indicates the residue is
3809 intrinsically disordered.
3810
3811 \textbf{Short disorder} Annotation rows predict for short, (and
3812 probably) context-dependent, disordered regions, such as missing
3813 residues in the X-ray structure of an otherwise globular protein.
3814 Employs a 25 residue window for calculation, and includes adjustment
3815 parameter for chain termini which favors disorder prediction at the
3816 ends. Values above 0.5 indicate short-range disorder.
3817
3818 \textbf{Structured domains} are marked with sequence Features. These highlight
3819 likely globular domains useful for structure genomics investigation. Post-analysis of disordered region profile to find continuous regions
3820 confidently predicted to be ordered. Neighbouring regions close to
3821 each other are merged, while regions shorter than the minimal domain
3822 size of at least 30 residues are ignored.
3823
3824 \subsubsection{GLOBPLOT}
3825 \href{http://globplot.embl.de/}{GLOBPLOT} defines regions of
3826 globularity or natively unstructured regions based on a running sum of
3827 the propensity of residues to be structured or unstructured. The
3828 propensity is calculated based on the probability of each amino acid
3829 being observed within well defined regions of secondary structure or
3830 within regions of random coil. The initial signal is smoothed with a
3831 Savitzky-Golay filter, and its first order derivative
3832 computed. Residues for which the first order derivative is positive
3833 are designated as natively unstructured, whereas those with negative
3834 values are structured.
3835
3836 {\bf Disordered region} sequence features are created marking mark range(s) of residues with positive first order derivatives, and 
3837 \textbf{Globular Domain} features mark long stretches of order. \textbf{Dydx} annotation rows give the first order derivative of smoothed score. Values above 0 indicates
3838 residue is disordered. 
3839
3840 \textbf{Smoothed Score and Raw Score} annotation rows give the smoothed and raw scores used to create the differential signal that
3841 indicates the presence of unstructured regions. These are hidden
3842 by default, but can be shown by right-clicking on the alignment
3843 annotation panel and selecting \textbf{Show hidden annotation}.
3844
3845 \exercise{Protein Disorder Prediction}
3846 {
3847 \label{protdisorderex}
3848 {\sl Note:} Before starting this exercise, make sure you enable the \protect{{\sl Add
3849 Temperature Factor annotation to alignment}} option in your Structures preferences
3850 ({\sl Tool  $\Rightarrow$ Preferences  $\Rightarrow$ Structure)}.
3851
3852 \exstep{Open the alignment from
3853 \url{http://www.jalview.org/tutorial/interleukin7.fa}. } 
3854
3855 \exstep{Run the DisEMBL disorder predictor {\sl via} the {\sl Web Service
3856 $\Rightarrow$ Disorder Prediction $\Rightarrow$ Disembl with defaults}.}
3857
3858 \exstep{Select all the sequences ([CTRL]-A or [CMD]-A). Open the Structure Chooser by placing
3859 the mouse in the Sequence ID panel, right clicking the mouse and select
3860 {\sl$\Rightarrow$ 3D Structure Data\ldots }. Select all structures in the list.
3861 Hit the {\sl New View} button to retrieve and show all PDB structures for the sequences.}
3862
3863 \exstep{Compare the disorder predictions to the structure data by mapping any
3864 available temperature factors to the alignment {\sl via} the {\sl Sequence ID
3865 Popup $\Rightarrow$ Selection $\Rightarrow$ Add reference annotation} option.}
3866
3867 \exstep{Features on sequences can conceal other colouring. This can be
3868 toggled off by selecting {\sl View
3869 $\Rightarrow$ Show Sequence Features} in the alignment window menu.}
3870 \exstep{Apply the IUPred disorder prediction method. Tick the
3871 {\sl Per sequence option} in the {\sl Colour $\Rightarrow$ By annotation \ldots} dialog
3872 box. Then shade the sequences by the long and short disorder predictors. {\sl
3873 Note} how well the disordered regions predicted by each method agree
3874 with the structure.}
3875 \bf See the video at:
3876 \url{http://www.jalview.org/training/Training-Videos}.}
3877
3878 \chapter{DNA and RNA Sequences}
3879 \label{dnarna}
3880 \section{Working with DNA}
3881 \label{workingwithnuc}
3882 Jalview was originally developed for the analysis of protein sequences, but
3883 now includes some specific features for working with nucleic acid sequences
3884 and alignments. Jalview recognises nucleotide sequences and alignments based on
3885 the presence of nucleotide symbols [ACGT] in greater than 85\% of the
3886 sequences. Built in codon-translation tables can be used to translate ORFs
3887 into peptides for further analysis. ENA nucleotide records retrieved {\sl via} the
3888 sequence fetcher (see Section \ref{fetchseq}) are also parsed in order to
3889 identify codon regions and extract peptide products. Furthermore, Jalview
3890 records mappings between protein sequences that are derived from regions of a
3891 nucleotide sequence. Mappings are used to transfer annotation between
3892 nucleic acid and protein sequences, and to dynamically highlight regions in
3893 one sequence that correspond to the position of the mouse pointer in another.
3894 %TODO Working with Nucleic acid sequences and structures.
3895 \subsection{Alignment and Colouring}
3896
3897 Jalview provides a simple colourscheme for DNA bases, but does not apply any
3898 specific conservation or substitution score model for the shading of
3899 nucleotide alignments. However, pairwise alignments performed using the {\sl Calculate $\Rightarrow$ Pairwise Alignment
3900 \ldots} option will utilise an identity score matrix to calculate alignment
3901 score when aligning two nucleotide sequences.
3902
3903 \subsubsection{Aligning Nucleic Acid Sequences}
3904
3905 Jalview has limited knowledge of the capabilities of the programs that
3906 are made available to it {\sl via} web services, so it is up to you, the user,
3907 to decide which service to use when working with nucleic acid sequences. The
3908 table shows which alignment programs are most appropriate
3909 for nucleotide alignment. Generally, all will work, but some may be more suited
3910 to your purposes than others. We also note that none of these include
3911 support for taking RNA secondary structure prediction into account when aligning
3912 sequences (but will be providing services for this in the future!) 
3913 \begin{table}{}
3914 \centering
3915 \begin{tabular}{|l|c|l|}
3916 \hline
3917 Program& NA support& Notes\\
3918 \hline
3919 ClustalW& Yes&\begin{minipage}[f]{3in}
3920 Default is to autodetect nucleotide
3921 sequences. Editable parameters include nucleotide substitution matrices and
3922 distance metrics.
3923 \end{minipage}
3924
3925 \\
3926 \hline
3927
3928 Muscle& Yes (treat U as T)&\begin{minipage}[f]{3in}
3929 Default is to autodetect nucleotide
3930 sequences. Editable parameters include nucleotide substitution matrices and
3931 distance metrics.
3932 \end{minipage}
3933
3934 \\
3935 \hline
3936
3937 MAFFT& Yes&\begin{minipage}[f]{3in}
3938 Will autodetect nucleotide sequences and use a hardwired substitution model
3939 (all amino-acid sequence related parameters are ignored). Unknown whether
3940 substitution model treats Uracil specially.
3941 \end{minipage}
3942
3943 \\
3944 \hline
3945
3946 ProbCons& No&\begin{minipage}[f]{3in}
3947 ProbCons has no special support for aligning nucleotide sequences. Whilst an
3948 alignment will be returned, it is unlikely to be reliable.
3949 \end{minipage}
3950
3951 \\
3952 \hline
3953
3954 T-COFFEE& Yes&\begin{minipage}[f]{3in}
3955 Sequence type is automatically detected and an appropriate
3956 parameter set used as required. A range of